Wednesday 18th May 2022

Gratitude for Women & Girls In My Life: IWD 2022. 15/2022.

Gratitude for Women & Girls In My Life: IWD 2022. 15/2022.

In past years I have made social media posts for IWD….International Women’s Day.

Today: Tuesday 8 March 2022 I want to go further:

My late Mother.

I did a recent tribute post to her here. We are together in 2003 where she & Dad had their favourite Winter stays 1990s to 2000s : Burleigh Heads.

 

 

My late Grandmothers and my Aunt.

Mum is in this collage too. This is from the tribute to them, from me, as Women of Courage. To be found here.

 

Women Who Helped Me Through Head and Neck Cancer:

from diagnosis, surgeries and into recovery.

Not every woman is here.

There are the ones who asked after me on social media, and are part of head and neck cancer groups.

There are my blogging friends…so many, and they are also here on the women of courage page.

I remain incredibly grateful for their:

Love

Compassion

Concern

Healing Wishes

So, with gratitude I honour my recovery with this collage:

From top left:

  • Every week, from 2017 I had coffee at Randa’s in Wyong. She cared for and about me on some very tough days. I remain in touch regularly.
  • Meeting Lisa via her establishment of the Big Hug Box: we shared a passion for giving back and for our cancer care at Chris O’Brien Lifehouse. Lisa’s story is here.
  • My Friend and Fellow Teacher…and HNC rare oral cancer friend. Tara. Smiles all round when we met. Her story is here.
  • A friend from social media is Dr Katie Nash, a Paediatrician who now lives on Central Coast, and very grateful for her time to chat and have coffee
  • Nadia Rosin: CEO of Head and Neck Cancer Australia. Friend and wonderful advisor to me as an Ambassador. This photo from day we met in October 2018 at Chris O’Brien Lifehouse.
  • Cate Froggatt. My goodness we sure have connected…hugs, words on line, and in person and as the surgical assistant to my professor, Cate has seen more of the inside of my mouth than me. A great friend…on the phone via reassurance too. Her story is here.
  • Julie: the nurse at the Oral Surgeon’s at Ourimbah who KNEW where to refer me for diagnosis and treatment after Stef, the oral surgeon told me I had cancer in my gums. So grateful over and over for her knowledge!
  • Two in one gratitude photo here: with A/Prof Puma Sundaresan who is the chair of Head and Neck Cancer Australia, and Dr Caity Frede, whose initiative to fund raise for HANCA was on behalf of her dad, who had succumbed to Head and Neck Cancer. I was honoured to be asked to speak at the charity fundraising event.
  • My local Federal MP Emma McBride. Emma has been especially interested in sharing more about head and neck cancer after she came to our place for morning tea in July 2018 prior to World Head and Neck Cancer Day.

Then I show my gratitude to these people.

The women and the girls I am related to by blood…as they say.

My daughter: (middle left & right)  an amazing person in many ways, who is far to self-effacing but her Mum can say that. She has raised her family singly but with some support and has been, at the same time, a person who also gives back, as a volunteer at Sydney Jewish Museum, and in past times at her schools, on local sports’ committees. Back to Uni and continuing to teach part time, and raise her kids through very challenging times, she became a teacher librarian at a local school but now, by invitation as stepped up to be an Assistant Principal. Her oldest three are all over 21 but her youngest child is still in primary school…so she is a busy woman. However, she is a caring one who keeps a lookout for her fellow staff members and in this time of covid and teaching from home has been an exemplary leader.

My eldest granddaughter and second granddaughter: (top left & bottom middle) Now adults I can’t say too much of course, but they are finding their feet in life, and staying connected to family. Both of these women were in our care quite a bit as kids, and we share some great memories now. They were also the duo who managed our pre-50th Wedding Anniversary photo shoot.

Our daughter’s youngest. (middle right) This one is somewhat shy but also loves to share her stories and life with us via media. We attended her 9th Birthday last year and she was one happy girl connecting with family and friends.

Our son’s three daughters. One is almost a teen and we are in bottom left and in top middle. Miss R was cared for by us from 5 months to over 5 years a few day a week and we so value her love and presence in our lives. Miss E, dark hair ( middle top, and bottom right) is a character who we cared for from around 5 months till 18 months. When we left Sydney we did not get the same chances to be carers for Miss M, blondie in top left, middle top, and bottom right, but we love her courage, and her determination. She shares my Mum’s name as her second name.

 

Thank you all. Your lives and your stories lift me up. To those not mentioned, you too are valued by me for your presence, love and friendship.

Every day…but especially on International Women’s Day.

Denyse.

This from my son today on social media. I am very touched and grateful.

 

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest

Fifteen Years Ago. Why 5 March Matters To Me. 14/2022.

Fifteen Years Ago. Why 5 March Matters To Me. 14/2022.

CW: death, mourning, grief

 

Today is Saturday 5th March 2022 and it marks 15 years since my dear mother died.

I say “died”…because the messages/words around death need to be used as they are meant to…to  convey meaning, not to confuse. I heard recently of a person being told on the phone, that a loved on, in a care home, was “gone” and that confused the recipient even more, because “where had he gone?”

About her 80th Birthday.

Mum said to Dad after attending yet another person’s funeral, “why do people wait till others die before telling them what they meant to them?” She was right. So, for her 80th Birthday, 6.12.2004, we hosted a Family Birthday Dinner and Celebration of Mum. I made a timeline with photos and the story of her life, and we were all there for her. Her husband, her adult kids and their partners, her adult grandkids and 3 grandchildren…and we shared words to her, in written form, cards and a speech of sorts. In looking back at the night, because I recently found the photos, there is a little video of Mum speaking about the gratitude she has for us all. I found that very touching and I am so glad I have it.

over 17 years ago! My brother & I with our parents.

Mum & Dad with B & Me, and our two children. 2004

Mum was the birthday cake maker….but not for her 80th. The look is so much my Mum…and the 3 great grandkids helped her with those candles.

I wrote back in 2017 for Telling My Story, a little of Mum’s history and what happened to her health after the celebration of her 80th Birthday.

Up until Mum’s 80th Birthday in December 2004 she had been quite well. A few so-called minor things were wrong and I know where my worry/anxiety gene comes from. But my mum, just as I do, could put on a smile no matter what.

So, we as a family watched over our Mum as her health, and with that her demeanour changed. Speaking to Dad now he says “she just wasn’t the same” and I know now why. In the course of her eventual hospitalisation in late January 2007 and an MRI, Mum was diagnosed with secondary brain tumours. Her downward health spiral the 2 or so years before had including symptoms of bad pain and some tremor but despite some doctors’ advice and care, Mum was a very scared reluctant visitor to doctors and specialists…and to hospitals. Obviously it was based on fear and Dad had to do what he could to convince Mum to get help and care. A big challenge. So, after the diagnosis of the secondary brain tumours, there was some ideas of what her primary cancers might have been but there was no way to know and Dad decided against an autopsy.

And now it’s the 15 Years Anniversary.

I don’t really know WHY this one is standing out to me but I am making some guesses:

  • Dad had a stay in hospital this week and whilst he is now back home, he is a visually impaired and mobility challenged, fully cognisant 98 year old. So, yes, I did get concerned “this may be his time” early this week.
  • Dad has no more peers, nor family members alive. Those who are his friends where he lives are in their 70s and 80s.
  • Dad says he missed Mum more than ever. I suspect with the added loneliness and covid restrictions he IS indeed lonely.
  • I finally accepted that his death will be a shock despite what I logically know
  • I am now, thank goodness, well enough and better in myself emotionally, to realise the significant of my Mum dying
  • I was a pretty distant daughter in my own way but that was because of “my” views of me, and perceived critical views of me by my mum.

Here’s why I needed to write and post today.

  • I appreciate now more than ever the mother Mum was to me
  • I was, and still can be, someone who is a challenge in relationships…mostly fuelled by my old ways of seeing me
  • I know that she gave me unconditional love
  • I know I WAS loved
  • I know that by sharing this now, I may be feeling more loving towards my Dad too.

He and I will chat today on the phone and I will listen to his thoughts.

We only have one chance at this thing called LIFE and I wanted to write more to enable this to be seen and viewed by me and others.

My Tribute in This Image & Words. 5.3.2022.

 

This was going to be a facebook tribute but then I changed to a blog post. I now am pleased to have done this.

Today, Mum, it’s 15 years since you died.

Wow. You had been quite unwell for around 2 years before this, and it was via secondary brain tumours that you succumbed.

Dad is missing you more than ever as he ages alone at 98, having left the home you shared together 4 years after your passing, to live at Dee Why.

Thanks for your love, presence, care and support in my life growing up. And then when Ibecomea mum, a very young one, married to B, another teacher & living in remote northern NSW.

Thanks too for the love, care and cooking for our family too,as I was a full time teacher. Taking our kids to stay and have holidays with you and Dad gave me respite. And they loved Noreen’s porridge and rice custard!

Your life was a busy one, and you gave a lot to the community. Thank you. And before you turned 80, we decided as you always said, it was better to tell people how much they meant to you before you died!

We listened, and your family, including by then, great grandchildren, did so on 6.12.2004.

What joyful photos and memories there are here!

You are missed by many, Mum & Noreen.

 

 

Love is a wonderful and necessary human connection to sustain life, but to love someone is to mourn for them once they are dead. I know that there is a saying along the lines of grieving is the price we pay for loving.

If this post has brought up memories or more grief from your past, there are people who will listen here: at Lifeline 131114.

Grieving is on-going and shows itself in all kinds of ways. It is something we live with. I know my grief today is heightened as it is an anniversary day.

I am going gently and kindly and thinking of my Mum and all she brought to my life…by giving me life.

Vale Noreen Simpson nee Chapple. Mum.

Mum’s Memories. After her cremation, Dad placed some of her ashes in pots, along with her favourite flower. Other family members did similarly.

Thank you for reading. I hope that it has not been too sad.

I am finding the power of writing on my blog a force for good.

Denyse.

 

 

Joining in with Natalie for Weekend Coffee Share today

Thank you Natalie.

https://natalietheexplorer.home.blog/

 

 

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest

Love Is… 7/51 #LifeThisWeek. 9/2022.

Love Is… 7/51 #LifeThisWeek. 9/2022.

LOVE is making my husband his fave chocolate cakes, freezing them, and he gets to enjoy one a day! Recipe: NMAA Cooks: Simplicity Chocolate Cake.

What is love?

  • You can’t see it. Only in person and in expressions of it…maybe.
  • But you might very well feel it, hear it and know it.
  • I am sharing a trip of nostalgic love from my life…

and at the end there is a quiz.

Not about the post but about something B and I found interesting as a 51 years together couple!

Here are some memories of what LOVE IS for me:

Parents to our daughter. Learning about unconditional love.

First selfies I think…with Ms now 12.

 

Love the privilege of introducing H to the beach, 13 years ago

 

LOVE is meeting our 6th granddaughter and 8th grandchild. 2015.

 

Now: love of learning, love of teaching and love for these young people, our children, who followed career paths of difference and now are working in professions they love too.

Love the moments of connection with little people. Those we are fortunate to call our grandchildren, and to have time to nurture our relationship over the years during the times they spent at our house for day care and for sleep overs.

I LOVE this photo I took of H & R as they were about to meet their new baby sister back in 2013.

We had the privilege of picking them up from school & preschool to do this.

 

Early morning after dawn on ANZAC Day. Love of and for my country.

 

Then there is this love: Nature…in its many forms.

Long time ago now, but back in 2011 when I first met many of the Aussie Bloggers who are still  my friends, I found a love of a different kind. One where I was included in a different social setting to my previous life as a teacher. One where I became accepted and enjoyed meeting with and enjoying how much blogging would come to mean for me. Here I am at 2012 Digital Parents’ Conference in Melbourne where I was a speaker: “My Blog, My Story.”.

I also would not be blogging now if it was not for the friendships made way past that time here, and into the communities where I have been accepted as a fellow blogger. I love the connections and that you who follow me and add your posts are here today. Thank you. I love that.

Colouring My World…with nature, colour and appreciation.

I also have a love for those who have helped reconstruct my life…my mouth and more following my cancer diagnosed in May 2017. Forever grateful for their presence and care in my life.

Love Stories: By Trent Dalton. Wow. I am listening via Audible and even though I have the physical copy of the book, his voice (and his emotions) gives it far more in terms of life as he knows it. And I got to meet Trent at Newcastle Writers Festival in 2019 and HOPE that he may be part of the yet to be announced program for 2022. Would love to catch up again.

  •  Uplifting True Stories about Love from the Internationally Bestselling Author of Boy Swallows Universe

 

And last but never least, is the relationship of love I have with my husband.

We have our ups and downs but far fewer as we live more gently in this quieter retirement we have made, and generally we are very well suited. As they say “opposites attract” but we also share lots of similar interests and have the love of each other at the heart of our relationship.

But, there are still some hiccups of connection along the way so recently we did this quite short but interesting (for us) quiz.

If you have a partner, it may interest you too. We are very late to the 5 Love Languages which were first heard of way back via Oprah and the man who came up with this. Since then, it has helped countless communicate just that little better as we have too. Not sharing our responses! Between us but it has been helpful.

 

https://www.5lovelanguages.com/quizzes/love-language

A timely post on Valentine’s Day 2022. I know it is celebrated around the world in different ways. Some commercial enterprises do try to help us into spending our money! Our grandkids’ high school has a “buy a single rose” event which can be pre-ordered and I think the money goes into a fund for end of year events. I do recall seeing kids walking out of school with the cellophaned red rose!

May love be kind to you and yours.

Denyse.

 

Life This Week. 14.2.2022.

You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week! NOT a link-up series of posts, thank you.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a kind thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to: Leave a comment on a few posts, because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere, or on your sidebar or let others know somewhere you are linking up to this blog’s Life This Week.

*Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog & the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. These may include promotions, advertorials and any that are overly religious or political or in any way offensive  in nature.

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter


FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest

My Father Is 98 Today. 3/2022.

My Father Is 98 Today. 3/2022.

In his mother’s arms. 1924.

My father, Andrew Simpson, was born in Wollongong NSW 98 years ago today.

11.1.1924.

He was the second child and first son to his father, Andrew and mother, Henrietta. His parents met via WWI when he was recovering from war related mustard gas poisoning & she was from the town where the hospital was located.

After the war, the war bride arrived to make her home in her new husband’s city of Wollongong. His family had emigrated from Scotland before WW1.

Dad went on the become brother to two more siblings. In the middle photo, Dad is around 11, and this is likely the last pic of his whole family.

Andy, Dad’s Dad, was fatally injured in a workplace accident at the Steelworks in Port Kembla.

So, it’s 1935, and already the effects of the Great Depression left their mark on Dad and his family. In fact, in a way, he has to grow up from then.

His mother, Gran as I knew her, became an embittered and sad woman not only because of widowhood but due to family matters, received no help at all from her late husband’s more well-to-do family.

What my father tells me helped him was:

Joining the scouting movement

Being an excellent student at school

Having some support from local men who ensured Dad’s education continued at Wollongong HS.

But, at 15, he needed to leave, to become employed and with his aptitude for office work, good understanding of figures, he was given an office traineeship with Australian Iron & Steel.

He worked hard, he rode a push bike to work and he revelled in the scouting connections.

From 1939-1945 Australia was in WW11, and Dad was working in an essential industry and could not enlist. He did community work with the Rover Scouts but it bothers him still that he could not play a part as many did…friends and family, to help his country.

By 1946, life sure stepped up a notch or 3, and he’d done very well with his clerical work and was on his way to being an accountant…and met a lovely woman who was a lady cub master, at Mt Keira scout camp, marrying her on 2.11.1946.

Dad found a different and more loving extended family via Mum’s relatives and was accepted by all. They worked hard, saving money and after 3 years, just about had a brand new house built in Gywnneville with the help of many friends, ready to welcome their first child, Denyse.

Sadly for Dad, and Mum too, he was obliged to go and work in Melbourne for most of my first year of life as it was company policy. He rode it out though, helped by me and mum flying to Melbourne to stay for a while.

By the time Dad returned and was told for his continuing employment – after all, this was a big company which had trained him and given him work experiences for over 10 years, he would be based in Melbourne.

With much thought, and in discussion with some independent mentors, he resigned and took up a role as the works accountant with a fertiliser company based in Port Kembla.

Life was improved  more so, with the addition of a son, and a Holden Car! Dad tells me he had a car in order for many months & whilst waiting had some basic lessons in driving, so when he took ownership of the car, in Sydney, his mate said “you drive home”.

Memories here are mine. Life as kids in Wollongong was family centred, we both went to the local primary school just down the street. We were taken to the beach, Dad helped us learn to body surf, we joined brownies and cubs, and enjoyed life with a few challenges. One was when Mum’s hearing, very damaged after childbirth, necessitated her having major surgery in Sydney and Dad managed work, seeing her and making sure us kids were OK with neighbours helping out.

The forever home and comfortable life in Wollongong did not remain. Dad’s skills were seen as being needed at the higher end of the company ladder, and was offered the role of Chief Accountant in the Sydney Offices of his company.

In recent years Dad & I have chatted about this big move which must have challenged their marriage as Mum had her family nearby and couldn’t even think about moving.  It did happen and despite the initial misgivings, turned out to be a richer and more varied life than either could have imagined.

Balgowlah Heights, Sydney  Years. 1959-2011.

Aspects of my parents’ life have also been covered within the Telling My Story series here.

Now, as I share on his actual birthday, and I cannot visit him because I am not well (not covid) I thought this might be a good way to share.

1960s into 1970s.

Dad’s life expanded socially and work wise with contacts in the new local community, joining scout association and kids’ cricket group both with my brother’s activities. Supporting our local primary school and getting to be part of the much larger community on the northern beaches. He and Mum joined sporting clubs to play social tennis and he became a golfer at Balgowlah Golf Club as a Saturday regular. It was a great sporting and social connection for him, eventually becoming the club  treasurer and later a life member.

Work was big and busy and often took him away for a day or more to visit work sites in relation to his financial role. As we kids grew up, Mum would often accompany him and that was best for them both.

The Big Trip in 1966.

His bosses were progressive with the big company take over of the original one, and Dad was selected to attend the Harvard Business School Management Summer Program at University of Hawaii in June 1966. A VERY big trip beforehand took him literally around the world, visiting places of business related to the big company. It changed his life in so many ways as he still tells us. Eight weeks away and endless friendships and connections made helped he and Mum when they then had their turns at international travel and over time, many trips back to Hawaii.

The class of 1966.

Kids Grow Up. Leave Home. More Happening! 

I left to teach at Barraba in 1970, and met my husband, marrying in 1971 and  my brother had an OS trip and work training, and then in 1976 married his wife. Dad saw that wherever we (the kids) ended up, he and Mum would come to visit where possible. He and Mum did get to see a lot of Australia thanks to us both.

Grandkids and Home Improvements.

In late 1971, our first child, Dad’s first grandchild, was born. As we spent each school holidays with my parents (we were country based teachers) our daughter felt that their place was her second home. In 1978 Dad made a big decision for his comfort and enjoyment…and added a large in ground swimming pool to the back yard and it was loved by many till the house sold. More grandkids arrived in 1979, 1980 and 1981.

Work Comes To An End. 1983.

Dad is a planner and very astute financially. He was tiring of the office work…especially as leadership changes did not appeal, and whilst he could have been promoted to the ‘top’ job said no. He preferred using his financial expertise and not having the ‘buck’ stopping with him. His retirement present from work was a farewell trip around the world…first class, I think, with Mum, to see all of the works’ related places where he had made friends.

Active Retirement Years. 1984-2005.

Golf more often, trips away, taking grandkids on holidays, having a  Gold Coast holiday for each winter, and much more. Helping his family out in many ways. Dealing with deaths of his mother, other family members and more. Pragmatic and an organiser meant things happened well. Garden maintenance, volunteering at a local youth club, making new friends, farewelling older ones and taking time to enjoy life. A walk along the beach at Manly and even a surf until it became physically challenging. Welcoming the first great grandchild, then over the years till now, another 10! Celebrating zero birthdays and anniversaries. Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1996.

Not Wonderful Times.

Mum was not well and in 2006 even though she was fine to celebrate their Diamond Wedding Anniversary with the family, it was clear her health was taking a toll on her and of course on Dad, as her main carer. In early 2007 Dad and Mum were told she was terminally ill with secondary brain tumours and the decision made by her, and supported all the way by Dad and us, was no treatment other than palliative care. Mum died on 5 March 2007. Dad was both relieved and bereft.

The next 3 years were ones of transitioning to being by himself and remaining as well as he could…and his goal remains that. A great walker and social person he continued his practice of getting out and about each day and meeting friends. But time, and a large cold house meant he was ready for more comfort and people around him.

New Beginnings. 

After selling the family home, Dad hosted a farewell to Curban Street with all of us there and it was bittersweet. Nevertheless he moved on and into the spacious, modern and well-fitted out apartment at Dee Why where he is today. He has made a whole group of new friends in the 10 years since he moved in. He hosted a 90th Birthday for friends old & new, and family at the RSL club next door 8 years ago. His health has remained good until the last couple of years where he was troubled with a balance issue and he spent 3 weeks in rehab getting that sorted. His GP says his heart is in great shape. Sadly, mobility is challenging but he has a walker. His eyes are affected by macular degeneration. But his mind remains incredibly active and rarely forgets anything. He can’t score at darts anymore because of his eyes. But he can listen to music, chat with others and use the phone. Interested always in learning more, his neighbours who are originally from the UK and he get together weekly for sharing knowledge and history. He cares for himself including minor cooking. He has a cleaner. He is well.

Today, even though I cannot visit him as I am not feeling well, friends are taking him out for lunch. Yesterday my brother, who lives close by, and family took Dad a cake, and we facetimed for his 98th Birthday.

He has no secret for living to this age. He has outlived all of his older times friends and his family.

Happy 98th Birthday Dad.

Denyse.

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest