Saturday 6th March 2021

Fallen. #SundayStills.#6.18/2021.

Fallen. #SundayStills. #6. 18/2021.

Each week I am writing and posting here for inclusion in the #SundayStills from this blogger and kind person, Terri from here.

And also this is part of my blog’s category for sharing photographs.

I have now combined the two and made a shared purpose photo for this photographic challenge.

What do you do when you get a prompt for Sunday Stills that is nothing to do with what you can relate to.

You come up with another version for “fallen” as I have now!

Falling! Fallin’ Fallen!

Oh I don’t know, let’s not get too carried away.

Back in 1970 two young teachers met at a Tamworth Teachers Conference. Story about that here. We admit we did “fall for each other pretty darned smartly”.

By the time this only know group of two pictures recorded us, we had FALLEN in love!

 

Now, what about that?

Without this, then these people would not have arrived in the world.

Our two dear children. As kids.

Then as they went on to have their children, our eight grandchildren, then the world would be a quieter and sadder place without them.

 

So, all in all, I think fallin’ for each other back then has paid handsome and invaluable dividends.

We paid out on that dividend with a celebration for our Golden Wedding Anniversary in late January 2021.

What did you think of my ‘take’ on Fallen?

Denyse.

Joining Natalie here for the Weekend Coffee Share.

I add this to my #SundayStills posts because I am not a wordpress blogger but have a self-hosted site. Do catch up with me if you are interested in knowing more and come on over on a Monday to link a post! Details below.

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Each Monday I hosted a link up called Life This Week. There are optional prompts. They can be found on the home page too.

Denyse: An Australian East Coast of New South Wales Blogger: Often found here:

 

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My Favourite Landscape. #SundayStills.#5. 16/2021.

My Favourite Landscape. #SundayStills. #5.  16/2021.

Each week I am writing and posting here for inclusion in the #SundayStills from this blogger and kind person, Terri from here.

This is my fifth post! I think I must be liking the new category for my blogging. Of course it is made better by the company I keep including Australian-based bloggers too.

Asking for my favourite landscape is a lot like asking for a post about my favourite grandchild. They are all favourites in different ways!

So, that’s my basis for this post.

I do like to be out in nature sometime each week even if it IS just for a down time, some taking in of the air and sounds, or maybe some splashing in water.

A landscape for me can be as simple as a view from a window, to a long road ahead and back to the beach for a windswept scene.

Here They Are!

Favourite Landscape: One. The Beaches of The Central Coast, New South Wales.

Norah Head. N.S.W. Looking east.

 

Norah Head Lighthouse. Looking North. Close to sunset.

 

Soldier’s Beach. Stormy weather in winter.

 

Lakes Beach. Post wash up of ALL the pebbles & shells!

 

Favourite Landscape: Two. Rural New South Wales.

Driving past country hills and pasture land of North Western N.S.W.

 

Narrabri: the sign points to the property that was our first home for 1971-72.

 

Horse and cattle studs not far from where we live.

Favourite Landscape: Three. One River. From a Few Places: Wyong, New South Wales.

The Wyong River wends its way to The Entrance and eventually The Ocean.

 

Part of the Wyong River at Porter’s Creek.

 

The lake from Tuggerawong.

 

More delightful reflections at Porter’s Creek.

Favourite Landscape: Four. Bridges and A Jetty from Lakes on the New South Wales Central Coast.

 

The bridge at Budgewoi Creek, is a special place for mindfulness for me.

 

A view from the northern side. Love the reflections. I came here to ponder many things happening in my life and when I was diagnosed with cancer, it was to here I came.

 

No chance of a walk after this flooding rain!

 

Long Jetty is a former jetty on the lake and now ideal for photos!

Favourite Landscape Five. Clouds and Reflections On the Tuggerah Lakes.

The hills, the clouds…and the solo pelican

 

I never tire of taking photos of the lake when it’s so still like this.

And even though I originally had 4 favourites, I added a fifth as I wrote the post!

I hope you enjoy seeing my part of Australia as much as I enjoy finding spots to photograph like these. Oh, and they are all via my Iphone 11 ProMax.

And joining with Natalie for #weekendcoffeeshare here too.

Denyse.

 

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Each Monday I hosted a link up called Life This Week. There are optional prompts. They can be found on the home page too.

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Clouds From The Southern Skies. #SundayStills. #4.12/2021.

Clouds From The Southern Skies. #SundayStills. #4. 12/2021.

Each week I am writing and posting here for inclusion in the #SundayStills from this blogger and kind person, Terri from here.

My images, are almost all from the Southern Hemisphere and on Australia’s East Coast.

 

Coastal Clouds: Semi-Tropical Area of Queensland in Australia.

Around 9 years ago, I was walking on Mooloolaba Beach on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland having a short break from life back at home in N.S.W. I also got to catch up with blogging friends and those from social media on that trip.

 

Coastal Clouds Heralding the Sun’s Arrival on the East Coast in Temperate Zone of N.S.W. Australia.

Around 7 years ago, I drove from where we lived in Sydney’s north-western suburbs to Manly beach on the coast, where I grew up, to capture sunrise in July.

 

Whispy Clouds of Winter on the N.S.W. Central Coast at Ettalong. 

A few years back, one grandson (his 2 sisters were elsewhere engaged near the sand) observing the water of Ettalong.

 

 

Pretty typical Summer clouds in Sydney.

Sunny Sydney, Australia,  in Summer. Magical Day To Be on a Ferry On the Harbour.

 

 

And in contrast, here is an Autumnal Cloud set above the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

I took this from the steps of the Sydney Opera House when I visited in May 2015 for TedX.

 

Clouds as far as the eye can see over Lakes Beach, Central Coast, N.S.W. Australia.

This is my ‘local beach’ now for best walking conditions.

 

 

Clouds at sunset, capturing the colours at the end of a Summer’s Day.

New Year’s Eve 2016. The Entrance, N.S.W. Australia. I went for a drive before dark in 2016, so peaceful.

 

 

AND, not in the Southern Hemisphere! Looking back at Waikiki. The clouds are so lovely in the afternoon.

These clouds over Oahu as I finished my day tour when I visited the magical Hawaii back in 2006.

 

I find the skies magical. I admit I look up most days and delight in the visions of clouds and a blue sky. Over a year ago, though, the sky was grey, smokey and the only clouds we saw were made from bushfire smoke.

Debbie from here, was far away in the U.K. when this was happening, watching the news from afar…and oh so grateful to see their property in Tumbarumba survived back home, even though others did not.

So far, this Summer has been OK. Nevertheless, we are always primed for taking care of property and ourselves in times of heatwave conditions…the start on one here as I write this post. We are taking care of our health and staying inside with the ducted air con!

Denyse.

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Each Monday I hosted a link up called Life This Week. There are optional prompts. They can be found on the home page too.

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What does Glacier Blue Look Like? #SundayStills. 9/2021.

What does Glacier Blue Look Like? #SundayStills.#3. 9/2021.

Each week I am writing and posting here for inclusion in the #SundayStills from this blogger and kind person, Terri from here.

I did my research. Well, I googled about this colour and came up with a couple of facts.
This via a colour swatch:

Source: https://www.schemecolor.com/white-and-blue-glacier.php

And this:

Glacier Blue reminds you of deep, arctic water. Unlike warm, turquoise water at tropical beaches, this blue water is light, but looks cold. You can almost imagine the chunks of ice floating in it. This cool, greyish blue has a nice depth to it, yet it’s not too dark.

 

Then I looked at my images, to fulfil the #SundayStills brief.

It appears being from a temperate area of the Southern Hemisphere I do not have any images to share. Friends who have travelled to the Antarctic or much further north may have,  as may those from New Zealand. But from this non-arctic traveller…not.a.thing.

Instead I have my Australian version of blue and water!

Enjoy my #SundayStills.

 

Blue sky and the harbour water of Sydney Harbour. This shot was taken by me on a ferry round trip from Darling Harbour to Circular Quay with 3 grandchildren back in the January School holidays of 2014. Looking closely at the Sydney Harbour Bridge you can see some shape in the middle. It was the basis for some of the fireworks that would be shown on Australia Day later that month.

 

And, from the same ferry ride, you may recognise the Sydney Opera House on Bennelong Point, as the ferry swings around to track back to the western side of the Harbour Bridge. These photos were taken on sunny Summer Days.

 

This one, taken by me at Seaforth N.S.W. a suburb next to where I grew up in the 1950s and 60s is from a different view of, again, Sydney Harbour but this arm of it is called Middle Harbour. Those boats and yachts spend a lot of time moored there but when they leave, the need to take a careful trip via the Spit Bridge – not seen, but far lower left, because that bridge has a part of the road that lifts up…given warning by the stop lights and more on the road, so boats can pass by out to the main Harbour and perhaps out to sea via the Sydney Heads.

 

And a favourite place of my Dad’s when he could walk without help, on these sands most days…and my niece swims there most weekends. This is Manly Beach, N.S.W. Australia, taken on the Shelley Beach Walk between South Steyne (Manly’s southern end) and the still waters around the cove at Fairy Bower.

 

 

This beach is on the N.S.W. Central Coast and I am pretty sure it is MacMaster’s Beach. I have swum there once when we lived closer. The water is a delightful colour and many are in the water. Late Summer into Autumn here according to the date on my image.

 

Last but not least in many ways. For us, when we lived in the warmer Summer suburbs of Sydney from 1978-2015 we added a swimming pool to our backyards. Firstly we started with above ground ones, and then progressed over the years to adding an in-ground pool to our places at Kellyville 1978-1993, Bella Vista (1994-1998) and here at the last place ‘that was ours’ Glenwood (1999-2015). The grandkids loved this pool. It was deliberately designed for little people who were gaining confidence in the water, with a large ‘beach area’ in the foreground and a wide swim out area on the right at the back.

 

 

I hope that these images have been of interest even though they do not contain one image of glacial blue, I am sure I will see more when I visit Terri’s blog to share this post and view those of others.

Thanks for checking out my images.

Denyse.

Please follow this blog via Bloglovin  see my home page for link in which to add your email address.

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Each Monday I hosted a link up called Life This Week. There are optional prompts. They can be found on the home page too.

 

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Remembering Sydney 2000. 37/51. #LifeThisWeek. 74/2020.

Remembering Sydney 2000. 37/51. #LifeThisWeek. 74/2020.

  • I admit right up….I was a Sydney Olympics tragic.
  • I was ecstatic when we found out that “Sydernee” was announced as the host city for 2000 Olympics. This was in 1993 as I saw on the weekend news, after hearing of the (then) NSW Premier John Fahey ‘s death.
  • Did we think Sydney could do this?
  • I guess I was part of the group “yes we can”.

The selection of the grounds where the stadia would be built and surrounding ground, waterways, wetlands…of a former brickworks and other industries at Homebush was somewhat controversial. And had plenty of challenges to get completed. But it was and I can say without any qualms I was one very proud supporter! The Olympic torch relay around Australia was amazing. The day it came closer to home for us, I drove to watch it being passed on at Rooty Hill. Quite an emotional time.

At school we were lucky to have a torch bearer visit and “I” got to hold it.

 

By the time 2000 arrived, I had already become a school principal and schools got to get involved in many ways, including attendance at practice events and to have special days of celebrations. Free tickets to practice events meant I went to the gymnastics with my daughter and her eldest. She figures in photos below!

 

The end of term 3 school holidays were extended by a week so all the busses could come to Sydney and help transport people along with added trains and train lines. No private travel to the area was to happen. All tickets sold had a transport payment factored in.

 

I got the badge collection fever early, even linking up for new releases for ages. Over time, the badges were added to a framed memory board. And, I then donated it to a school library. I also had a fantastic framed photo of the Opening Night and donated that to a school down the track too. Many bits and pieces of memorabilia and my writing went into 2 huge scrapbooks…and do i have them now? No, again, donated I think along with above to the school where my daughter was teacher-librarian. I admit, to have these now would have been nice but they were cumbersome and I would hope be of greater value as a historical resource.

Onward:

Memories here: with photos I could actually find!

Dear granddaughter, who came with me to this ‘practice’ of looking at the grounds once they were built and developed and we could drive there. August 2000.

Outside the main stadium. 2000.

Noting the street names after Olympians.

Number Plates: still going strong. For our respective 50th Birthdays in 1999.

I still love these and they were special gifts to us from our family for our 50th birthdays!

And, always a very patriotic Grandma ensuring Miss 4 got the whole Olympic experience! 

Miss J, always happy to share her Grandma’s enthusiasm was delighted to be dressed up. Her younger sister and parents joined us at our place to watch the Opening Ceremony on our TV. What an experience, just from the telly. I will never forget the horses’ entry to the Man from Snowy River theme.

The three mascots are a duck-billed platypus (Syd), a kookaburra (Olly) and an echidna or spiny anteater (Millie). They symbolise the water, air and earth respectively. Their colours correspond to those of the Games emblem, and all three are typical examples of Australian fauna. source: wikipedia

We WENT to the Olympics!

After a lot of discussion and then knowing we had to get in quickly as tickets were balloted we secured ones to a morning of track and field. It was amazing to be up close..even though we had to wear our ponchos for a while. Some events were slowed down because of rain on the track, you can see it here in 2nd shot.

My husband & I went to the Athletics on a wet day. No worries

 

Our seats were amazing. Almost on the track!

 

The wonder of how Sydney was then! Amazing co-operation and fun all round. 

Lots of smiling and chatting people on the busses to and from the Olympics. We parked our car on a field (now covered in buildings) at Bella Vista, just over the road from Glenwood and busses took us straight to the gate.

We got to see international athletes in OUR time zone. However, I do believe some events were staged at particular times to allow for northern hemisphere news.

I got to attend practice events: free. We attended one big day and tickets were reasonable cost and we had to apply by ballot. I also got tickets to the Paralympics and my then son-in-law came with me along with granddaughter as above.

One big standout memory for me, was standing up with my family to sing Advance Australia Fair as an Aussie won her event at the Paralympics.

My mother was a hockey representative in her youth and a very keen follower of most sports. My brother got tickets for him and Mum to see, I think a women’s hockey semi or final. Mum was blown away!

Great signage and organisation. A lot of walking but it was all OK.

So much detail here: blurry. However, some areas like these had TV people telecasting. Solar panels on top of the pylons.

AND, “where were you when Cathy Freeman won gold?”.

I saw the event on a TV at the local doctors’ surgery! I don’t remember why I was there but I do remember the elation and event.

This post goes live AFTER the first airing of this below. However, I will watch on iView and hope you may as well. It’s a special event AND memory of the Sydney Olympics.

https://help.abc.net.au/hc/en-us/articles/360001745615-ABC-is-proud-to-present-the-world-premiere-of-FREEMAN-in-September-Relive-the-magic-of-the-Olympic-Gold-medal-win-that-united-the-nation-

Source: pinterest 66c6cb3bd663ac5e77c9388d0b6b990b.jpg

What memories do you have of the Sydney Olympics?

Did you attend?

How old were you at the time of the Sydney Olympics? I was 50.

If you viewed from another state or country, what are your memories?

Were you part of any of the ceremonies?

Tell us more!

Denyse.

Link Up #206

Life This Week. Link Up #206

You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week! NOT a link-up series of posts, thank you.

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My Favourite Decade. 8/51. #LifeThisWeek. 18/2019.

My Favourite Decade. 8/51. #LifeThisWeek. 18/2019.

Given my age, and my so-called group status as a “Baby Boomer” it would not be a surprise to read that my favourite decade is the 1960s.

The decade where my childhood faded, and the teen years beckoned then ended with my teaching career started.

All from ages 12 to 20.

Why oh why was it the best?

I wish I had an image for each of what I remember as highlights but instead, it’s a list and there are a few back up pics.

1960.

Into a new to us Primary School that was much bigger than the one we went to in Wollongong and I had many more people to get to know and achievements to make. The best part of 1960 was having Mr Duffy as my Yr 5 teacher and knowing that I too wanted to be a teacher.

1961.

Year 6. There were two classes and there was quite a bit of competition to do well and whilst I was not as academically gifted as many I liked the ‘leadership’ aspect of Year 6 and our relative independence. We were allowed to leave the school grounds and walk to the local shops for lunch when we had money for that. I remember hot chips and a malted vanilla milk in a carton.

It was the end of year camp that was not so wonderful as my first period decided to arrive during the 10 day camp on Lake Macquarie. Never mind, no swimming, but you can write and edit the Camp Magazine. It was fun. And it was printed on a metholated spirit printer. Remember them? They were still around when I began teaching.

The BIG deal too that year was the Year 6 Farewell Dance. Oh My! Hair done, new dress selected, stockings to wear (a garter belt held up the stockings, a bra fitted, with due embarrassment, at David Jones’ city store and my first tiny heel on a shoe. Wow.

1962.

To High School. We were the cohort of the first 6 years at High School in N.S.W. for the ‘new’ Higher School Certificate as planned by the education review called the Wyndham Scheme. We were indeed guinea pigs but off to the almost brand new single sex public school Manly Girls High, I went. I was put in the top class and there were a total of 7 or 8 classes per year. Getting to know new friends and to go to sport at a local swimming pool and to work with a timetable and catching a bus to school was all part of this time.

1963.

My social life was more fun than school but still I persisted. I would have preferred French and Art as my 2 picks for subjects added to the compulsory four but my dad insisted on French and German for the matriculation purposes in Year 12. But even though it was not as clear as that I complied. I was still part of Girl Guides but not devoted at all and went on a pretty wet camp south of Wollongong. I left Guides once I could. I also began teaching Sunday School. I like little kids and the idea of teaching. I was not as enamoured with the church side of it.

1964.

More independence and I began regular paid evening baby sitting gigs which I continued with the same family till I left for my first teaching appointment. I also began doing some school holiday office duties at Dad’s work. I sure was not interested in helping Mum much. I did a typing course at night in Manly where it was safe for me to catch a bus home in the evening. I went to an after school Ballroom Dancing class each week (i.e. meeting boys class) and my first boyfriend was from the local boys’ school. Ah Col. We had some good times and I got my first friendship ring the next year.

I went to see the Beatles in June with my friend and my brother. It was amazing to actually see, not so much hear, the Beatles.

I began collecting records. Dad was keen on all music and I could play my 45s (the small ones) and my 33s (the big ones) on the family stereo.

I got my first transistor radio and was glued to the evening shows with Mike Walsh and won prizes as I was quick on the phone. Yes I “was” doing homework but could multi-task!

1965.

A big year. Well, that was how it was made out and in terms of the new 6 years of school it was. We had to sit an external examination  called The School Certificate. In completing the School Certificate, the plan was that unless you wanted to go to University, Teachers’ College, enter Nursing or Secretarial College,  then you left school at the end of Year 10 to do an apprenticeship or go to a job. About 2/3 of the whole Year 10 would have left. It was a big shock doing our first external examination to find that the “one” compulsory component – poetry – of the English paper was not one I had prepared for nor knew much about it. Neverthless I passed all of my subjects, and we celebrated with parties at people’s places.

It was the year Sound of Music was released and more movies that genre were about: Doctor Zhivago, My Fair Lady, and so on. When we went to the movies, there was always a double feature with the main movie starting second after interval. I had a new boyfriend by the beginning of the next year, and we met via the social group at Manly Presbyterian Church.

1966.

Again social life precedes school life but the existed side-by-side thanks to joining forces with the local boys’ high schools to appear in a Gilbert and Sullivan Show, and to attend dances. Of course. Greater independence as some of the boys now had cars was for me to be ‘dropped’ by Mum or Dad into Manly on a Sunday afternoon and attend the social/church event and afterwards to go to a local coffee shop. Very trendy.

I continued to do some holiday work for Dad, and to babysit but social life aka love life beckoned more. It was during Year 11 that we of the first to do the HSC got to select and wear a senior uniform and to have some freedom with some teaching time off for ‘study.’ I was active in the School Magazine and social events but came down with a crash when my Year 11 results were not exactly stunning.

I moved on….to

1967.

Ah, a big year and one in which the boyfriend and I split (bye Rob) and hello Stu. Met through the same place. Good old Manly Presbyterian Church Fellowship. This one was already at Uni! He had completed the last of the Leaving Certificate (like my never yet met husband) and was doing Ag Science at Sydney Uni. He had a car. He lived at home with the friendly younger brother and his mum. My younger brother got to meet his, and with their neighbourhood friends, THESE blokes are still mates! Me, broken up with the bf in 1970 …another story for another time. Oh yes, here it is here.

This year was when I got my licence: P’s, could borrow Mum’s car, had more social engagements inclyuding Uni balls, and then realised I needed to put my head down to actually study in the lead up to the H.S.C. It worked, and in saying that it was a slight disappointment that I did not get a NSW Dept of Education scholarship in the first round of offers, but early in 1968.

Meanwhile from end of H.S.C. in November my father had secured a job interview for me (thanks Dad, not!) and in early December 1967 instead of holidaying like my friends, I began as a filing clerk in the human resources section of the A.B.C. in Elizabeth St. If I was happy about one part of this, I was now 18 and could meet up with bf and his mates after work and we could go to the new Wentworth Hotel, the Menzies or even the one where the Hilton is now and have a drink. I did not drink much at all but it was nice to go to those places.

1968 – 1969.

Yes, you are off the Balmain Teachers’ College: sign here to ensure your ‘bond’ of employment for 3 years after graduation and we will send you anywhere in N.S.W. as you will be a permanent teacher. And stayed that way until 2003.

I signed, our neighbour was the guarantor as was the case back then, they paid me $22 a fortnight to become a highly trained and eminently qualified teacher. It was a rigorous course: 5 days a week, every single day taken up with learning how to teach and what to teach kids aged from 5-12. Whilst I specialised in Infants teaching I qualified as a K-6 teacher. I LOVED it all. We had Wednesdays for optional activities and another arvo for sport – we had to learn what we would teach. All set in the now very posh (but not then) suburb of Balmain where the smells of making soaps at the local Colgate factory as well as the plumes from the coal-fired electricity plants at White Bay.

My social life continued with many activities based around our mutual friends’ birthdays. 21st parties were huge. As were Sydney Uni and NSW Uni Balls. I think I went to at least 4 in a year. New dress, please Mum! And I was lucky. Mum kept me looking good by being my accesory and ally in clothes shopping and hair dressing appointments.

School was even more part of my life. We did 2 pracs each year, a prac of our choice at the beginning of the second year after Christmas holidays and we also attended the North Sydney Dem School to watch selected experienced teachers and learn from them. I did well at Prac. I loved it. I had wanted to do this for a very long time and now I was.

I got to do pracs at my old primary school: Balgowlah Hts – Yr 3 and Yr 2, Mona Vale P.S. – Kinder, Neutral Bay Yr 1 and North Sydney Dem Year 2 (I was given this prac as my teaching and preparation was excellent and the Dem school was a prized place.

Graduation was formal. My parents and boyfriend attended. He had finished his Bachelor of Ag Science and was looking for work in North-western NSW. He landed a job at Tamworth. In the school holidays at the end of 1969 into 1970, my preferred teaching place came for me. I accepted: a North-western NSW country town called Barraba: about 45 minutes from Tamworth. To find out what happened next: go here. I have already written about it!

That is why 1960s was/is my favourite decade!

What is yours?

Denyse.

I join in these two other Monday Link Ups from Australian Bloggers.

Alicia is at One Mother Hen here for Open Slather and Kell is here at All Mum Said for Mummy Mondays. Go over and link up there too!

You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today!

Next week’s optional prompt is: 9/51. Taking Stock. 4/3/19.
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