Wednesday 23rd September 2020

Observations in October #3. 2018.107.

Observations in October #3. 2018.107.

Regular readers will recall I love mandalas.

I liked making patterns and designs too, but somewhere in mid 2016 mandalas caught my attention, and I was onto them. Firstly I bought a book which helped me design my first few (and I remembered geometry taught in primary school!) and then I took off.

I made a promise to myself to make 100. I exceeded it. Mandalas made by me have gone to others to use as decorations or just to enjoy. I truly love sharing them.

Our dining table, when visitors are here,  is adorned with versions made with laminating tbat have become coasters, table places and mats. My Dad has quite a few in frames at his place.

This week I did something I have been looking forward to for a while. I began teaching a class of adults about the mindfulness of colouring and using mandalas as my examples.

By the time this is posted, it will have happened. I shall report back!

Reporting back! On Tuesday 8 people joined the class and that was awesome. Each told me they came for learning, to have a new thing to do and to chat with others. It went so well they are returning next week!

What I am hoping is that you, my readers, also begin to appreciate and see mandalas where you go.

I noticed these walking down one street in Wyong on Sunday.

Three of my grandchildren were delighted to see that I had left parts of a new mandala for them to colour (using my best markers!) and they did a super job.

From The Mandala Workbook – A Creative Guide for self-exploration, balance & well-being. by Susanne F. Fincher. P1.

What Are Mandalas?

 Mandala is Sanskrit for “magic circle” and in the most basic sense, a mandala is simply a circle. Since ancient times in many cultures the mandala has had a powerful role in depicting, containing and expressing the sacred.

 Mandalas can come in many forms, from stone carvings, to domed cathedrals, ritual dances and calendar cycles.

 No matter their form, mandalas often us a profound way to examine our inner reality, to integrate that understanding with our physical selves and to feel connected to the greater universes. 

 “The circle has been universally accepted as a religious image of perfection, a shape of total symmetry, hermetically closed off from its surroundings. It is the most general shape, possessing the fewest individual features but serving at the same time as the matrix of all possible shapes” Rudolf Arnheim.

 

Mandalas are everywhere and here in each ceiling at Chris O’Brien Lifehouse is one:

I see them in nature. Everywhere I look.

 

Will you look too now?

Denyse.

Joining my friend Leanne and others who link up here for Lovin’ Life each Thursday.

 

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Comments

  1. I’m so happy your class went well Denyse. It’s a perfect thing for you to be doing – sharing all your talents and helping others. You’ve created some incredible mandalas and I’ve yet to do one! There’s not enough hours in a day for me to do all the things I’d like to do! One day! #TeamLovinLife

    • Ah Min, you have so much on your plate right now I can see that making another thing part of your day would not work.

      However, if you ever get to want to colour some in, KMart have high quality books of mandalas for $5. I bought one to re-energise my pattern selection and it is one you can use markers in.

      Denyse x

  2. I adore how you find mandalas in nature – and so pleased that you’re now teaching a class in mindful colouring. I couldn’t think of anyone more suited to do that.

    • It is a bit of an addiction…I find myself saying ‘mandala’ under my breath when I see one as I am driving or walking. I guess in terms of mindfulness that is good.

      Thanks for the kind words, it was ‘good’ getting back to teacher-mode but with adults it is very different!

      Denyse x

  3. I’m so glad the class went well – I’m sure everyone enjoyed it… and I love how ‘looking’ for things in nature makes us live in the moment more. (I know when I do ‘photo of the day’ type things I’m like that as I have to pay attention for opportunities around me!)

    • Yes it really is good to ‘notice’ I reckon and becoming a part of your daily routine makes it mindful practice.

      I find myself looking out the car window when stopped at traffic lights and noticing whatever is blooming in the road dividers. Sometimes it is not wonderful, but often it can be just one flower amongst the weeds.

      The class was great. I was ‘good tired’ afterwards but as they all said they will be back, it went well!

      Denyse x

  4. These are fabulous Denyse. What a great hobby. #TeamLovinLife

    • Thanks so much Kathy, it grew out of a love of making patterns and when I read about mandalas I was quick to give them a go. Now, it is rare for me not to have one started or ready to colour.

      Great stress release and helps me become mindful very quickly as I concentrate on “just one thing!”

      Denyse x

  5. Congratulations on a successful class Denyse, and thanks for sharing your love of mandalas. I will definitely be watching for them now.

  6. That’s very cool. Love that you lead that class. Must have felt great to get back in front of a class

    • Thank you I did and it was. Now, if the booking system can be sorted it will be even better!! LOL. Too long a story.

      Denyse x