Sunday 27th September 2020

Women Of Courage Series. #53. Yvonne McClaren. 71/2020.

Women Of Courage Series. #53. Yvonne McClaren. 71/2020. 

A series of blog posts on Denyse Whelan Blogs to be found here from mid-May 2019: Wednesdays: each week until the series concludes in 2020.

Here is the introduction to the series.

Courage is strength in the face of pain or grief. It’s doing something that frightens you. We face situations that demand courage every day. These situations provide us with choices, and the way we respond to those choices determines our future. Dayne Shuda.

Whilst I have not ‘met’ today’s Woman of Courage in real life, as they say, we have most certainly connected by the common (and not ever-welcomed) diagnosis of Head and Neck Cancer. Yvonne, who is 54, has shared her story below via the responses to the questions but to know even more about her and how she is facing life full-on these days, check out her links! Recently she appeared  too as part of the Beyond Five live video segment relating to food preparation and eating for those affected by head and neck cancer, particularly as in Yvonne’s case and others, relating to swallowing.

Dysphagia is the medical term for difficulty in swallowing. This includes problems with sucking, swallowing, drinking, chewing, eating, dribbling saliva, closing lips, or when food or drink goes down the wrong way.

The link to the video is at the end of this post.

Thank you Yvonne for sharing.

 

 What have you faced in your life where you have had to be courageous?

There are a few times in my life where I have had to reinvent myself both professionally and personally. I think my latest challenge with finding a large tumour on my left tonsil has been my greatest challenge.

There have been other life-threatening situations – involving motorbikes, but this was really out of my control. Once diagnosed I responded with ‘silence’ – I went into myself I realise now.

It was a difficult time as I had relocated countries, left my full time job to start a new life and career and had my heart broken all in the space of 8 weeks, then a cancer diagnosis.

Suffice to say, I had little time to grieve anything, it was get on with it and start the treatment. Everything was put on hold in terms of dealing with loss of income, loss of love and in some respects the loss of my beloved father a year earlier.

It’s only now, 18 months after diagnosis, that I am starting to mentally deal with some of the other issues going on in my life at that time.

 

How did this change you in any way? Please outline further if this has been the case.

I had no time to consider anyone or anything else really.

I was on my own and thankfully had my mum still in her own home where I could live whilst going through the treatment.

I had had a sore throat for many, many months and jokingly said to a friend “I think it’s cancer” not really believing it, turns out 6 months later I was right.

How has it changed me?

I listen to my body really closely now, I use to before, but this has made me very aware of what thoughts I have running through my head, what niggle is going on and why… it also made me realise that every second you spend worrying about some insignificant thing is wasted time.

Get on and do it and do it now. Whatever it takes.

I lost the last five kilos I couldn’t budge and then some, so that was great for me, not an ideal weight loss programme but it started me back on my fitness journey 15 kilos lighter.

I now have to learn how to eat again and for a foodie I have found this the most distressing, depressing and difficult side effect.

Food was/ is my world and I have had to retrain and rethink what that looks like now. It also made my fledgling idea about teaching culinary pursuits in a foreign country come to fruition.

 

Is there something you learned from this that you could recommend to help others who need courage?

 

You always have choices, for me, I sat with it and the implications and thought about the worst-case scenario.

I was also told by a well meaning nurse that my cancer treatment had not worked and there was nothing more they could do for me. That sort of puts things in a very stark perspective, it’s humbling and it’s frightening.

It’s also incredibly motivating when I discovered that was not the case.

Learning to manage emotions is something you also can practise and become the master.

I then figured well if that’s as bad as it gets (death / inability to function normally/ disability) then make the most of what you have now.

I also discovered that you lose “friends” along the way, whether they can’t handle the new you, or who you have become or are becoming is too hard for them I don’t know.

I have had to make an entirely new circle of friends and have reacquainted myself with ones I have not had much to do with for years.

What I can say is, you are innately very strong you just don’t know it yet.

 

Do you think you are able to be more courageous now if the life situation calls for it? Why is that?

Yes, I am doing things now that are very much out of my comfort zone, although some would say riding through Vietnam and Laos on the back of a motorbike during a typhoon is getting out of my comfort zone too, but this disease and its side affects have made me realise that everyone has a message and a story.

In many ways this disease has focused my life’s purpose, I had all the scaffolding ready but now I have the ‘reason’ to hoist the flag on top of the scaffolding.

 

Is there any message you would give to others facing a situation where courage could be needed?

Don’t spend time worrying about things that might happen, focus on the now and take it one step at a time.

There is literally  someone else worse off than you, I’d hate to be that person by the way whoever they are, I guess it’s all relative.

 

Do add anything else that you think would help others who read your post. 

 

My job as I see it now is to spend my time doing what I love, what I love is cooking and if I can help others with eating difficulties as a result of HNC and its treatment then that’s what I am going to do.

I come from a family of teachers so it is not surprising to me that ultimately, I want to use my skills to help others.

I have set up The Food Manifesto and Soup hug as a way to bring a community together that suffer from this debilitating side effect.

I like to think of myself as the food curator for dysphagia, the link between your dietitian and your kitchen.

 

What a story of resurgence here. I can say that because I did not know Yvonne until she found the friendly facebook group for Head and Neck Cancer Patients, Carers, Professionals and Families. It is here, too, where I ‘met’ another Woman of Courage Maureen whose story is here.   There is another Woman of Courage called Tara Flannery who shared about her head and neck cancer here.

And this Woman of Courage shared her story. She is Julie McCrossin AM, who is also a Community Ambassador for Beyond Five and is part of the webinar Yvonne appeared in below.

 

Thank you again Yvonne. I am so pleased you are doing all you can to be well and help others too.

This is the penultimate post in the Women of Courage series.

Denyse.

Beyond Five, where I am a Community Ambassador released this video live just before World Head and Neck Cancer Day 2020.

Please take some time to view…and see what Yvonne shares from her kitchen and share with others who may benefit.

Thank you.

Social Media Links for Yvonne:

Blog/Website:  www.thefoodmanifesto.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/McclarenYvonne

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/sustainablefoodandtravel/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_food_manifesto/?hl=en

 

On Thursdays I link here for Lovin Life with Leanne and friends.

Copyright © 2020 denysewhelan.com.au – All rights reserved.

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Self-Care Stories #5. Gratitude. 34/51. #LifeThisWeek. 68/2020.

Self-Care Stories #5. Gratitude. 34/51. #LifeThisWeek. 68/2020.

An update from Denyse: today I am having more surgery to manage some infection that has taken hold in an area of my abdominal wound from 21 July surgery. Sigh. However, I will be glad to get it done, and unlikely to pop back to comment until I am home. I should only be in overnight. Send all good healing wishes, please!! 

Writing about self-care is a regular optional prompt.

I wrote last time here about self-care in COVID-19 times.

The COVID-19 times are not going away any time soon, so this time I have broadened my view to remembering my word for 2020:

G R A T I T U D E

This blog post: so hopeful, and giving me (and readers) guidance on how I was going to find gratitude each day for:

3 6 6 D A Y S of 2 0 2 0.

Then mid-way through the year, quite a reality check! Here is what I wrote then…..

A word (or more) from me:

 

How did I, or have I, tried to find gratitude in each and every day to fulfil my goal of an instagram post every day?

I did, and have but on some days it was much harder than others.

These are but some of my gratitude-based photos (not all were shared on instagram) that remind me:

EVERY

SINGLE

DAY

of what I am grateful for.

So, my self-care remains in good form as long as I am also doing my utmost to find gratitude. It can be obscure but I am a determined person and like to think I see things through!

Now, how about a little self-care from me to you…via a short video taken last week at my favourite spot: Soldiers Beach carpark. Looking north to Norah Head Lighthouse.

Take care everyone one…self-care always first.

Denyse.

Link Up #203

Life This Week. Link Up #203

You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week! NOT a link-up series of posts, thank you.

* Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to: Leave a comment on a few posts, because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere, or on your sidebar or let others know somewhere you are linking up to this blog’s Life This Week.

*Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog & the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. These may include promotions, advertorials and any that are overly religious or political or in any way offensive  in nature.

* THANK you for linking up today! Next week’s optional prompt: 35/51 Share Your Snaps #7 31.8.2020

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter


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Women Of Courage Series. #52. Stella. 67/2020.

Women Of Courage Series. #52. Stella. 67/2020.

A series of blog posts on Denyse Whelan Blogs to be found here from mid-May 2019: Wednesdays: each week until the series concludes in 2020.

Here is the introduction to the series.

Courage is strength in the face of pain or grief. It’s doing something that frightens you. We face situations that demand courage every day. These situations provide us with choices, and the way we respond to those choices determines our future. Dayne Shuda.

 

I welcome Stella, who is 70 years old, to share her story as a woman of courage. However, I also need to share that ‘we’ have known each other for decades. In fact we grew up in a similar area of the Northern Beaches in Sydney and ended up being in the same classes from time to time at Manly Girls’ High. We are both in this photo. Can you find us? This was an image I shared in N.S.W. Education Week a few weeks ago. Stella and I ‘found’ each other again via facebook and another friend from that time, who has shared her story too. Ann Thanks for the nostalgic trip!

Stella Shares Her Story In Her Words, Here. 

  • This year is the 20th anniversary of the scariest time in my life. I was 50, really healthy, working full time and bringing up my two teenagers. Life was good and I had no worries.

 

  • One afternoon after work, I lay down to read, and saw in the wardrobe mirror that I had a very swollen abdomen. It was big enough to make me head straight off the bed and to go down to the doctor.  He was very off-handed, and said “So you’ve gained weight – what do you expect ME to do about that ?”

 

  • Until that point I’d always been a very shy and diffident person, and his words would normally have made me apologise for wasting his time  – and gone home feeling stupid.  Which could have been a death sentence for me.

 

  • For once in my life, I knew that I had to be courageous and speak up, advocate for myself and demand that he  pay some attention.  He did that , and sent me for an ultrasound which revealed a very large malignant ovarian cancer.

 

  • Within 24 hours I was in the hospital and had had a very long and serious operation. A week later I started having chemotherapy.  I faced all of that alone, since I had downplayed the situation to my family. My Dad had recently died, and I couldn’t bear to tell Mum and my kids that I might be going on the same path.

 

  • I plucked up all my courage, and did the whole thing solo. Every day I would meditate, and go for walks around the hospital, thinking positive thoughts and just enjoying little things like a new flower growing in the ward garden. I read good poetry , words to give me courage to face another day. The staff remarked on how calm I was, but it was really courage which was keeping me in that serene frame of mind.

 

  • One night my doctor popped his head around my door and told me had news. All the results had come back and as far as he could see, my cancer was in remission. It was great news, and I was able to go home  and back to work without too much stress.  The courage which I’d found within myself on that first day, stayed with me and gave me a very positive outlook.

 

  • Since that experience, I’ve become a spokesperson for women with ovarian cancer. I also trained as a phone counsellor, talking to women who’d just been diagnosed with the disease. I think that the courage I found on that first day, gives me a good inspiration when I talk to women – encouraging them to dig deep to find their courage, to demand good treatment and good communication with their doctors.

 

  • Ovarian cancer used to be called “The Silent Killer” because women didn’t know they had it until it was too late. 80% of them used to die. I’m one of the fortunate 20% , and with some courage in my back pocket I can speak for those 80% of sisters who didn’t survive to tell the tale.

 

Stella Burnell 2020 .

 

https://www.ovariancancer.net.au/

https://www.facebook.com/OvarianCancerAustralia/

 

 

 

What have you faced in your life where you have had to be courageous?

  • I’ve had many experiences where courage was needed – in my work as a nurse I’ve often had to pull up my “big girl pants” and tough it out, but it was really my own experience with cancer which used my courage to heal myself.

 

 

How did this change you in any way? Please outline further if this has been the case.

  • I’d say that since the day that I first got the diagnosis, I’ve never again been the shy and retiring person that I used to be. It was a defining moment and I often use it when talking to other women, to illustrate how courage can help you to assert yourself in health situations. I am no longer the “invisible older woman” but have found my voice and I help other women to find theirs.

 

Is there something you learned from this that you could recommend to help others who need courage?

  • I learned that you don’t always need other people to support you, when the going gets tough. In the particular instance that I mention, I had to “fly solo” and in fact I found that it was easier because I didn’t have to be around other people. Solitude was a great healing factor !

 

Do you think you are able to be more courageous now if the life situation calls for it? Why is that?

  • Yes, I am. I found my courage at that time, and it stands me in good stead every day now.

 

Is there any message you would give to others facing a situation where courage could be needed?

  • In a health situation like mine, I’d say that education is a great thing. If you find out everything you can – as scary as that can be – you will be able to face up to any eventuality with courage.

 

Thank you so much Stella, education is so important in keeping our health under some person control and if not, then to know who to go to for more help. You did this is so many ways and as I know, via the links above, have most likely helped many women who have faced a diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

Denyse.

 

 

Joining each Wednesday with Sue and Leanne here for Mid Life Share the Love Linky.

On Thursdays I link here for Lovin Life with Leanne and friends.

Copyright © 2020 denysewhelan.com.au – All rights reserved.

 

 

 

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I Want. 33/51 #LifeThisWeek. 66/2020.

I Want. 33/51 #LifeThisWeek. 66/2020.

Last week I wrote this post: Why Did I Start A Blog?

Today I conclude the ‘Why I Blog” series with ‘I Want’ because that is essentially the ‘why’ of blogging for me.

I want:

  1. to connect with readers who visit this blog
  2. to stay relevant as a blogger 
  3. to post topics of interest with a range of my expertise and interest
  4. to contribute to conversations about a range of topics
  5. to be able to learn from others who blog
  6. to know that I am a blogger who is inclusive
  7. to be a blogging friend to those who link up often
  8. to see that my posts on all topics have relevance to my audience
  9. to visit others’ blogs and connect via commenting and support
  10. to continue writing, posting, commenting and sharing my blog posts with others for as long as my work is of interest to others and I am not feeling stale nor bored

It’s been a very big learning curve to be a blogger.

I say that because, for me, it was quite foreign to my world of work in education. Yet, as  determined person who does not eschew hard work, I did my best to blog for what I had found was my way:

Conversational

Informational – based on experience

Photo-centred

Stories shared

Difficult Topics Which May Be Helpful

Creativity and Art

Health & Mindfulness

After a huge move (literally) in our lives, from Sydney to the Central Coast at the beginning of 2015 I set myself a goal. To keep me focussed on “doing this one thing EVERY day”…. I wrote a blog post Every.Single.Day. of 2015. No-one read the posts bar me, until, I re-visited the best way to connect more broadly and that was:

L I N K  U P S.

Hosted by fellow bloggers.

Yay for that. I linked up posts for some time on the Annoyed Thyroid’s link up each weekend , Kylie Purtell’s on a Tuesday and Kirsty Russell on a Monday. Great news! I was meeting up with old friends and new. Right into 2016 and I continued…slightly decreasing my posts and relieved to do so.

I found I needed a good refresher of how this blog looked and made contact with an old Sydney friend, Tanya, who enriched the look and settings of the blog already set by my techie guy and that meant 2016 was even better. I made a commitment to blog almost every day under these topics:

I was having a good time, connecting and meeting new bloggers. Lots had just started blogging, others had left and there was talk of a linky being retired and I asked if I could, perhaps, with permission take over the Mondays with Life This Week. I got a lovely approval from my friend and in September this LINK UP kicked off….and is now #202!

I was also delighted to know there were link ups happening here (co-hosted) on Wednesdays  (sadly for me, this one is finishing up soon) and here on Thursdays. Thank you for your link ups! They are great places of connection.

I Want: to write my memoir.

I had been postponing the idea of writing a memoir of my life until a friend and blogger encouraged me to try writing the chapters in blog-type posts. I did this. Here is the first one. I was not to know it would be a while before the next one!!

I Want: to share awareness of head and neck cancer.

Those who have been here since then and before will know that things changed very fast for my life and priorities when I got a head and neck cancer diagnosis in May 2017. I did think long and hard before pressing publish on this but the love and support which came back to me proved why I love to blog and love my community. The post is here.

I Want: to promote and encourage education- self and others always.

I also told the story of how I like to learn…this was because as a life-long educator I was placed in the role of student at an adult crochet class and because of how poorly my needs were understood I never went back!

I Want: to feel well within myself and portray that confidently.

As an anti-dote to cancer treatments and letting myself be positively impact each day, I began a daily routine some 4 months into my cancer and started to ‘dress with purpose’. This became a photo on instagram each day…and then over time one big boost to my self-confidence when I had no upper teeth and was still in cancer-treatment mode. Here’s what this was about. 

I Want: to have women share their stories of courage.

From May 2019 I introduced a series to the blog for women I invited (or who self-invited) to share their stories: answering 5 questions. This series, Women of Courage continues….I am so pleased this has been a success. Many women have told me what it meant to share.

I Want: to show my appreciation to you, my readers, bloggers and friends. Some even joined me for my 70th birthday morning tea late in 2019. Many of you I may never met but already feel you are good friends. This blogging business is a great way for me, a relatively isolated retiree, to connect.

I Want: to continue blogging. Writing a post up to 2 times a week is good for my health and for my connections. Over time, I expect with fewer Women of Courage stories, my Wednesday posts will be a way to make some changes of direction if that’s what I choose.

This Is Why I Blog!

Thank you all. You have made a difference in my life.

Denyse.

Link Up #202

Life This Week. Link Up #202

You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week! NOT a link-up series of posts, thank you.

* Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to: Leave a comment on a few posts, because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere, or on your sidebar or let others know somewhere you are linking up to this blog’s Life This Week.

*Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog & the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. These may include promotions, advertorials and any that are overly religious or political or in any way offensive  in nature.

* THANK you for linking up today! Next week’s optional prompt: 34/51 Self-Care Stories. #5. 24.8.2020

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter


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Women Of Courage Series.#51. Anna. 65/2020.

Women Of Courage Series.#51. Anna. 65/2020.

A series of blog posts on Denyse Whelan Blogs to be found here from mid-May 2019: Wednesdays: each week until the series concludes in 2020.

Here is the introduction to the series.

Courage is strength in the face of pain or grief. It’s doing something that frightens you. We face situations that demand courage every day. These situations provide us with choices, and the way we respond to those choices determines our future. Dayne Shuda.

I’ve been following Anna on twitter for quite some time. She is an author of a number of books, see below, and is aged in her late 30s. I have learned a lot about Anna’s resilience and her vulnerabilities via her tweets because she tells things as they are. For her. Yet, she always has something kind to say about many. When I asked Anna to be part of the series, COVID19 was in its early stages of infiltration in Australia. Now, at the time of publication, Anna’s hometown of Melbourne, Victoria is doing this hard lock down for several weeks. Anna tweets about that and more and she is admired and cared for by many. 

Thank you Anna, let’s catch up with your responses now. 

 

 

 

What have you faced in your life where you have had to be courageous?

As someone who lives with significant mental health issues, I find it hard to understand myself in the context of this word ‘courageous’. I have had to find fulfilment in the small things, and be satisfied with minute progress day to day, and I suppose that manifests as a kind of courage – a will to carry on and to always find new reserves.

 

How did this change you in any way? Please outline further if this has been the case.

This has always been the way.

I do think the challenge of chronic illness has given me skills to better deal with acute crises; when a situation calls for it, I can draw on the decades I’ve spent understanding myself, my feelings, my actions, and hopefully present more courageously!

 

Is there something you learned from this that you could recommend to help others who need courage?

Go to therapy, if you can!

It helps with so many facets of being a human.

 

Do you think you are able to be more courageous now if the life situation calls for it? Why is that?

Yes, as above – years of trying to undo what my brain believes has taught me to push back on fears.

I’m still wildly anxious, but I’m much better at rationalizing it now.

 

Is there any message you would give to others facing a situation where courage could be needed?

It’s within you, I suppose.

There’s a good chance you’re stronger than you think.

 

The responses may be brief here but there is a lot of wisdom and experience evident in Anna’s reflections on the questions. Thank you again, for sharing your views based on experience and truth. I always appreciate catching up with you on twitter. 

Denyse. 

Anna Spargo-Ryan
Copywriter, essayist, novelist

@annaspargoryan
Twitter: http://twitter.com/annaspargoryan
The Gulf & The Paper House
“Extraordinary” – The Saturday Paper
“Anna Spargo-Ryan is a writer to watch.” – The Monthly

 

 

 

The following information may be helpful to you or another. These are Australian-based.

Your Family G.P. can be a helpful person to listen and make referrals.

Lifeline on 13 11 14

Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636

Phone 13 HEALTH (13 43 25 84) for 24 hour assessment, referral, advice, and hospital and community health centre contact details

Qualified Psychologists can be found by visiting https://www.psychology.org.au/FindaPsychologist/

Australian Counselling Association is on 1300 784 333 to find a counsellor

 

Joining each Wednesday with Sue and Leanne here for Mid Life Share the Love Linky.

On Thursdays I link here for Lovin Life with Leanne and friends.

Copyright © 2020 denysewhelan.com.au – All rights reserved.

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Head & Neck Cancer Challenges: FOOD! 31/51#LifeThisWeek. 62/2020.

Head & Neck Cancer Challenges: FOOD! 31/51#LifeThisWeek. 62/2020.

Filming with Beyond Five For Nutritional Videos. See Below.

In the past two weeks for my #LifeThisWeek posts, Head and Neck Cancer has been the focus.

Regular readers know I have had head and neck cancer, and now, cancer-free (fingers crossed) I like to share stories and help others. It was World Head and Neck Cancer Day 2020 last Monday and I wrote about this here. The Monday before, it was an update on head and neck cancer, here.

You know, I hope my readers are never tired/bored of this awful cancer being shared…because it is, sadly, a growing one here and around the world, and many of you have left me know, that if it wasn’t for my posts, you too would not have known.

FOOD!

Love it.

Right?

Of course.

Once I was diagnosed with head and neck cancer back in May 2017 and found out I was having radical and reconstructive surgery to remove HALF of my MOUTH…my inner thoughts were: “how can I eat?” Not well. Not right away and for me, in fact for the 14 months after July 2017 a very challenging way of keeping myself nourished…and perhaps even emotionally sustained by food followed.

Here are posts where I went into more detail…and some images I share. From then.

Eating After Gum Surgery Part One.

Eating After Gum Surgery Part Two.

 

Eating with No Teeth Head & Neck Cancer

 

My First Year With Teeth

 

FOOD as Nutrition. It Heals and Sustains Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

I have had an interesting relationship with food to be honest. However, I will just say, I did eat reasonably well, but I also used food to comfort and be ‘kind’ to myself. Ring any bells for you?

That aside, going into Chris O’Brien Lifehouse on 6th July 2017 to know my mouth and ability to eat/feed/nourish myself was changing forever. In the first couple of days post big surgery I was in ICU and I recall the person I now know as Jacqueline – Dietitian come by and then, once I was in my room, she spent some more time with me as I moved through more of the (dreaded, shudder, feed via the naso-gastric tube…to W A T E R…oh happy day with me and the Speech Pathologist Emma.

Here’s the thing: Head and Neck cancer patients MUST maintain their weight. Stay well. Eat as well as they can. This ‘diet’ from the past Denyse found that hard initially. However, when I told my head and neck surgeon I had put on 5kg since getting my upper prosthesis 7 months early he said “GOOD”

Jacqueline did her best to educate me about keeping up high quality protein, even if it was via a commercial mix once I was home. I spoke to her of my treats (lemon syrup cupcakes) I had made and froze before surgery and she told me the words I loved hearing:

VALUE Add to foods. So, have your little cupcake warmed through and add full fat dairy topping: icecream custard, yoghurt whatever is your preference.

I admit I ended up working on how to feed myself food I thought a mouth with much added skin, stitches on top and 8 teeth on the bottom could manage. I am creative. I did come up with some good tasty foods. By the end of 14 months of having those foods, until I had some teeth added as a prosthesis, I admit, I did not want to eat any more like them. That’s for another day.

In 3 weeks time it will be 2 years since I have had upper teeth in the form of a prosthesis and that is amazing. I am also a Community Ambassador for Beyond Five, and earlier in 2020 I was invited to be interviewed about my eating with a head and neck cancer diagnosis and what I have learned.

 

 

https://f.io/F1Z5QQpT

The remainder of the videos can be found here on Beyond Five.

https://www.beyondfive.org.au/life-after-cancer/diet-and-nutrition/nutrition-videos

 

Thank you to all at Beyond Five and the former patients and carers I met as well as the Allied Health Professionals. It was something I was initially reluctant to do, and in the end “did it in one take and a thumbs up”.

Have you ever been filmed for viewing on TV or on-line?

Denyse.

Link Up #200

Life This Week. Link Up #200

You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week! NOT a link-up series of posts, thank you.

* Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to: Leave a comment on a few posts, because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere, or on your sidebar or let others know somewhere you are linking up to this blog’s Life This Week.

*Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog & the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. These may include promotions, advertorials and any that are overly religious or political or in any way offensive  in nature.

* THANK you for linking up today! Next week’s optional prompt: 32/51 Why Did I? 10.8.2020

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Share Your Snaps #6 #WHNCD. 30/51#LifeThisWeek. 60/2020.

Share Your Snaps #6 #WHNCD. 30/51#LifeThisWeek. 60/2020.

Devoting today’s Share Your Snaps to: World Head and Neck Cancer Day 2020. It’s today.

Sharing the stories is part of what I am able to do here on the blog and in other social media but they are not all “my” stories. Some of course, belong to others.

The photos here cover a range of people who have been given a head and neck cancer diagnosis. Some may have had surgery, others radiation and chemo. Some a mix of all. I had surgery only.

 

Head and Neck cancer not well-known as a cancer, even by G.P.s and some specialists. The work of Beyond Five continues to offer up to date information for patients, families, carers and professionals. My work as a Community Ambassador is to share awareness of the role of Beyond Five.

Today: WHNCD,  I pay tribute to the head and neck cancer community around me and further afield.

I admit I did my first year of HNC (as it’s also known) alone until I was invited to be part of the Central Coast Head and Neck Cancer Support Group.

 

  • Sharing the stories…in pictures and some words, this World Head and Neck Cancer Day.

 

  • Women of Courage Who Are Head & Neck Cancer Survivors Shared Their Stories Here:
  • Maureen Jensen from New Zealand. Story Here.
  • Tara Flannery from Australia. Story Here.
  • Julie McCrossin from Australia. Story Here.

 

  • May there be greater funding for research into HNC AND supportive grants to Beyond Five so that more information can be shared via the website, webinars and “in real life” events if COVID ever lets that happen again.

 

  • Last week’s post was more detailed about head and neck cancer and its signs and more. In the coming weeks, as of today, Julie McCrossin AM and professional leaders in the field relating to head and neck cancer will be sharing on-line here. This on-line event replaces the Forum to be held last June which was cancelled due to COVID.

 

  • I am particularly grateful to be part of a New Zealand-based Head and Neck Cancer Support Group on Facebook. Started a while back, it is a friendly, reassuring place to be to ask some questions, find some support and to know you ‘are not the only one’ with head and neck cancer…even if it is still pretty rare. Find the group here. You will need to answer some questions first before acceptance.

 

  • To you, my blogging community, I say thank you over and over for your interest and support in this ‘hnc’ thing of mine from when I was diagnosed. I am incredibly grateful to be well…but also to be well-supported here. The link to my Head and Neck cancer posts is here. I am told this has been useful for some patients and families to read. Makes me grateful to use my blog for this purpose too.

I still have another 2 years of cancer checks to go …the next is in September. I never take it for granted that my version of head and neck cancer has gone forever.

Denyse.

Link Up #199.

Life This Week. Link Up #199.

You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week! NOT a link-up series of posts, thank you.

* Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to: Leave a comment on a few posts, because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere, or on your sidebar or let others know somewhere you are linking up to this blog’s Life This Week.

*Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog & the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. These may include promotions, advertorials and any that are overly religious or political or in any way offensive  in nature.

* THANK you for linking up today! Next week’s optional prompt: 31/51 Food. 3.8.2020

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Why “Women of Courage” As A Series? 59/2020.

Why “Women of Courage” As A Series? 59/2020.

As of today, 50 women have shared their stories. 

I did not assign a #number to my post or Jane Caro’s. 

Women of Courage.

This is what I wrote to each woman who agreed to be part of this series. Interestingly I had only “one” knock back initially. I am so proud of the women who are sharing their stories in the weeks and months to come. Over time as I continued to invite women  to consider adding their stories, I did get more ‘no thank you’ responses but obviously a lot more “yes, I will” ones as the series had spanned over one year.

“Thank you for agreeing to share your story for my Women of Courage series of posts which will be published from mid May 2019 onwards.”

I got this idea from attending the Newcastle Writers Festival and hearing the wonderful Jane Caro speak about her book Accidental Feminists. IF you ever get a chance to listen to or read Jane’s works they are very good.

Jane’s Women of Courage story is here.

What I considered after that day and in the days to come is how we women have a tendency to underplay our achievements and whatever else we are doing in our lives. I know this is changing.

Many of you know I have had the experience of a cancer diagnosis, treatment and recovery and I am aware I had to garner a lot of courage to come through much of what has happened. This is  my own courage post, you will read something different where I believe I was courageous.

I am excited, interested and curious about these stories from real life…and women of courage!

I hope you are too.

Extract from my post introducing the series here in May 2019.

 

And I added this…which I am repeating here. 

If you would like to share your story of being a woman of courage* please let me know in the comments and I will email you. That would be great!

*there are no men included as I  think we women do not talk or not write about our stories enough which is why I have called the series: Women of Courage.

  1. What have you faced in your life where you have had to be courageous?

 

  1. How did this change you in any way? Please outline further if this has been the case.

 

  1. Is there something you learned from this that you could recommend to help others who need courage?

 

  1. Do you think you are able to be more courageous now if the life situation calls for it? Why is that?

 

  1. Is there any message you would give to others facing a situation where courage could be needed?

Send me an email: denyse@ozemail.com.au to become part of the series. You will be glad to join in. I have been told quite a few times now how therapeutic and helpful it was to write.

Won’t you consider this please?

Next week, the series continues.

I am recovering in hospital today, after some pretty serious surgery. Not related to my head and neck cancer, not cancer in any form. But, major in its own way. I think, over time, I might blog about it but not yet. If I take a while to respond to comments, this will be why. Rest assured, once I am home, I will want to be back on the computer and blogging!

I may not be responding to comments today…but I will!
For this reason, I will see how I go for linking up as I usually do.

Sure hope my hospital has good wi-fi.

Cheers,
Denyse.

Two weeks prior to the surgery, I took myself to the beach to try to gain better perspective for me…and I found it as well as support from many, for which I am very grateful. These stairs are a reminder that my recovery will be step-by-step and a challenge but not one I cannot complete.

 

Joining each Wednesday with Sue and Leanne here for Mid Life Share the Love Linky.

On Thursdays I link here for Lovin Life with Leanne and friends.

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