Monday 23rd September 2019

I Am Grateful Series. 81-100. 69/2019.

I Am Grateful Series. 81-100. 69/2019.

I am grateful every day.

This is the last of the series of “I am grateful”. I know more now that I ever did that just stopping for a moment when I feel down or a bit anxious, to think of something I am grateful for can change my inner mood. I continue to be amazed by that and I am glad to remember to do this!

Since learning more about myself, from before, during and after my cancer diagnosis, I know that I am better emotionally when I express gratitude.

  • I do this in a number of ways.
  • I will silently think of 5 or 10 things (using my fingers!) that I have been grateful for that day before I go to sleep.
  • I always express my gratitude to the person who has served me and made me my coffee. There are very few exceptions to this and watching someone’s face light up means the gratitude bounces back I guess.

A few years back I wrote a post about gratitude and how I was keeping a journal then. I am re-posting here what was, and still is, an excellent source about the value of:

GRATITUDE

The social benefits are especially significant here because, after all, gratitude is a social emotion. I see it as a relationship-strengthening emotion because it requires us to see how we’ve been supported and affirmed by other people.

Indeed, this cuts to very heart of my definition of gratitude, which has two components. First, it’s an affirmation of goodness. We affirm that there are good thing in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received. This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.

The second part of gratitude is figuring out where that goodness comes from. We recognize the sources of this goodness as being outside of ourselves. It didn’t stem from anything we necessarily did ourselves in which we might take pride. We can appreciate positive traits in ourselves, but I think true gratitude involves a humble dependence on others: We acknowledge that other people—or even higher powers, if you’re of a spiritual mindset—gave us many gifts, big and small, to help us achieve the goodness in our lives.

from here.

I have been going out each day since late October 2017, dressing with purpose and having a coffee. In my small journal I might do some art or I might write to get my thoughts out.

Recently, I gave myself the challenge (I like a challenge!) of coming up with 20 things I was grateful for over 5 days, making a total of 100.

Over the past weeks I shared those groups of 20. Today’s is the final list. Of course, the grateful list can go on and on! I am sure there will be more.

81. That I am less impulsive in shopping now

82. Cool weather after heat waves

83. My behaviours when I am particularly stressed can few modified by me now with skills I have learned

84. Local ‘BIG’ shopping centres for browsing, people watching and sometimes buying

85. Waiting more patiently now: for big and little things/experiences

86. Realisation that eventually being able to buy our own place may not be ‘the be all and end all”

87. I have a range of strategies for self-help and modifications to my attitudes and behaviours

88. That I know what unconditional love it as a giver and recipient

89. My mind continues to stimulate me with new ways to create in art

90. Seeing young families interacting reminds me of the ‘load’ we can seem carry as parents but appreciate it is over before we realised it!

91. Sending appreciation in greetings, cards and gifts to those who have helped me or just to help someone know I am thinking of them.

92. Mandalas. I love to make them but I ‘see’ them everywhere too

93. Succulents: I am growing them successfully and love their patterns

94. My second favourite coffee order of a piccolo will do me if I can’t get a double shot small latte

95. Icing. On the little cakes. I know I am being a bit flippant here but I love the sensation and the taste. Much moreso since cancer in my mouth

96. Cooking for others in batches because I know it helps them to eat and me to share.

97. Being a planner. Not an over the top one as I was, but keeping appointments and so on.

98. My art journal and kit I take with me everywhere

99. Finding that I had cancer in May 2017 and that it could be removed and it was

100. That I am very grateful to be alive and living well.

101. For you, my blog readers, for being here and commenting! Oh so grateful.

 

How do you express gratitude?

Denyse.

Joining in with Min here for her Tuesday #ztt link up. This week will be the last for a while. See Min’s post.

Thank you readers who come here on Tuesdays to comment.

I came back to Tuesday blogging to support Min and to write on topics which fell into the broad groups via Zen Tips Tuesday. I was fortunate to be a guest poster here too. For now, and the foreseeable future I will not be writing posts as regularly on Tuesdays with the exception being in the lead-up to World Head and Neck Cancer Day on 27 July 2019.

                  Beyond Five.

Denyse Whelan Head and Neck Cancer Patient now Ambassador.

Consider a donation of $5 or more to my Virtual Event

For Head and Neck cancer patients, family and friends. This is a website and offers lots to help. It continues to grow and change but with no government funding, some donations by companies in related fields and one part-time business manager, a fund-raiser was initiated in 2018 called Soup for the Soul. Soup is often a food that patients with head and neck cancer can manage and it is comforting.

Soup for the Soul is already live and I have a Virtual Soup for the Soul page here. More about that as we get closer to World Head and Neck Cancer Day on 27 July.

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I Am Grateful Series. 61-80. 66/2019.

Beyond Five.

Denyse Whelan Head and Neck Cancer Patient now Ambassador.

Consider a donation of $5 or more to my Virtual Event

For Head and Neck cancer patients, family and friends. This is a website and offers lots to help. It continues to grow and change but with no government funding, some donations by companies in related fields and one part-time business manager, a fund-raiser was initiated in 2018 called Soup for the Soul. Soup is often a food that patients with head and neck cancer can manage and it is comforting.

Soup for the Soul is already live and I have a Virtual Soup for the Soul page here. More about that as we get closer to World Head and Neck Cancer Day on 27 July.

 

 

 

I Am Grateful Series. 61-80. 65/2019.

I am grateful every day.

Since learning more about myself, from before, during and after my cancer diagnosis, I know that I am better emotionally when I express gratitude.

I do this in a number of ways.

  • I will silently think of 5 or 10 things (using my fingers!) that I have been grateful for that day before I go to sleep.
  • I always express my gratitude to the person who has served me and made me my coffee. There are very few exceptions to this and watching someone’s face light up means the gratitude bounces back I guess.
  • I consider how another person’s day may be going and ask them how they are because we connect that way and I am grateful for the exchange.

A few years back I wrote a post about gratitude and how I was keeping a journal then. I am re-posting here what was, and still is, an excellent source about the value of:

GRATITUDE

The social benefits are especially significant here because, after all, gratitude is a social emotion. I see it as a relationship-strengthening emotion because it requires us to see how we’ve been supported and affirmed by other people.

Indeed, this cuts to very heart of my definition of gratitude, which has two components. First, it’s an affirmation of goodness. We affirm that there are good thing in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received. This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.

The second part of gratitude is figuring out where that goodness comes from. We recognize the sources of this goodness as being outside of ourselves. It didn’t stem from anything we necessarily did ourselves in which we might take pride. We can appreciate positive traits in ourselves, but I think true gratitude involves a humble dependence on others: We acknowledge that other people—or even higher powers, if you’re of a spiritual mindset—gave us many gifts, big and small, to help us achieve the goodness in our lives.

from here.

I have been going out each day since late October 2017, dressing with purpose and having a coffee.

In my small journal I might do some art or I might write to get my thoughts out.

Recently, I gave myself the challenge (I like a challenge!) of coming up with 20 things/experiences I was grateful for over 5 days, making a total of 100. Over the past weeks and one last time next week, I  share the groups of 20.

61. That I got to live at 61 Curban St from 1959 till 1970

62. That my Aunty Poppy who died at this age, showed me what unconditional love was

63. My family: close and extended cares about me

64. That I am in essence a creative person

65. Cooking is a fun way to create: when I am in the mood

66. Colours delight me

67. I love to drive and staying safe is #1 priority & I got my licence in ’67!

68. My mind – given a good challenge and coming up with the answers

69. “Enough” money for coffee and a treat most weeks

70. That I “WILL” get to 70 on 30 November 2019

71. My ability to choose foods with better health outcomes than I used to

72. My recliner chair. Ahhhhh.

73. Warmth of the heated pad on my back in said chair..Ahhhhhh

74. ACCEPTANCE is a growing concept I am getting embedded within

75. My support for others with head and neck cancer is 100%

76. Walking. That I can. I do want to walk more too.

77. Enough clothes now for every season and reason and in my size.

78. My continued connections with education

79. That my husband has his space for his work and hobbies

80. That I too have my space for the above.

How do you express gratitude?

Denyse.

Joining in with Min here for her Tuesday #ztt link up.

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I Am Grateful Series. 41-60. 62/2019.

I Am Grateful Series. 41-60. 62/2019.

I am grateful every day.

Since learning more about myself, from before, during and after my cancer diagnosis, I know that I am better emotionally when I express gratitude.

  • I do this in a number of ways.
  • I will silently think of 5 or 10 things (using my fingers!) that I have been grateful for that day before I go to sleep.
  • I always express my gratitude to the person who has served me and made me my coffee. There are very few exceptions to this and watching someone’s face light up means the gratitude bounces back I guess.
  • On some days when life just feels ‘blah’ I have learned just to find something (0ne thing!) to be grateful for can make the mood shift.

A few years back I wrote a post about gratitude and how I was keeping a journal then. I am re-posting here what was, and still is, an excellent source about the value of:

GRATITUDE

The social benefits are especially significant here because, after all, gratitude is a social emotion. I see it as a relationship-strengthening emotion because it requires us to see how we’ve been supported and affirmed by other people.

Indeed, this cuts to very heart of my definition of gratitude, which has two components. First, it’s an affirmation of goodness. We affirm that there are good thing in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received. This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.

The second part of gratitude is figuring out where that goodness comes from. We recognize the sources of this goodness as being outside of ourselves. It didn’t stem from anything we necessarily did ourselves in which we might take pride. We can appreciate positive traits in ourselves, but I think true gratitude involves a humble dependence on others: We acknowledge that other people—or even higher powers, if you’re of a spiritual mindset—gave us many gifts, big and small, to help us achieve the goodness in our lives.

from here.

I have been going out each day since late October 2017, dressing with purpose and having a coffee. In my small journal I might do some art or I might write to get my thoughts out.

Recently, I gave myself the challenge (I like a challenge!) of coming up with 20 things I was grateful for over 5 days, making a total of 100.

Over the  past weeks, I’ve been sharing  these groups of 20. This is my third set of 5 groups.

I Am Grateful: 41-60.

41. Understanding myself better

42. Acceptance of differences between me and others

43. A spirit of generosity

44. My conversational approach with people

45. My S M I L E…it’s back!

46. My greater knowledge of nutrition to help me eat better

47. My ability to weigh up situations independently

48. My RED car: always

49. Weather and climate here where we live

50. My B E D

51.  A range of social media followers

52. Pillows. So many. So needed.

53. Noticing nature

54. Details: I see the details everywhere

55. Patterns: I also see them everywhere

56. My moral code

57. Honesty: appreciating others’ honesty too

58. Telling My Story: on the blog: over time

59. That is IS a story worth telling.

60. My memory: already listed this: so will now wonder about memory and say “memories”

I am grateful of course to you, my readers and fellow bloggers and to Min whose link up is called Zen Tips Tuesday and is found here.

Thank you!

Denyse.

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I Am Grateful Series. 21-40. 59/2019.

I Am Grateful Series. 21-40. 59/2019.

I am grateful every day.

Since learning more about myself, from before, during and after my cancer diagnosis, I know that I am better emotionally when I express gratitude.

I do this in a number of ways.

I will silently think of 5 or 10 things (using my fingers!) that I have been grateful for that day before I go to sleep.

I always express my gratitude to the person who has served me and made me my coffee. There are very few exceptions to this and watching someone’s face light up means the gratitude bounces back I guess.

A few years back I wrote a post about gratitude and how I was keeping a journal then. I am re-posting here what was, and still is, an excellent source about the value of:

GRATITUDE

The social benefits are especially significant here because, after all, gratitude is a social emotion. I see it as a relationship-strengthening emotion because it requires us to see how we’ve been supported and affirmed by other people.

Indeed, this cuts to very heart of my definition of gratitude, which has two components. First, it’s an affirmation of goodness. We affirm that there are good thing in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received. This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.

The second part of gratitude is figuring out where that goodness comes from. We recognize the sources of this goodness as being outside of ourselves. It didn’t stem from anything we necessarily did ourselves in which we might take pride. We can appreciate positive traits in ourselves, but I think true gratitude involves a humble dependence on others: We acknowledge that other people—or even higher powers, if you’re of a spiritual mindset—gave us many gifts, big and small, to help us achieve the goodness in our lives.

from here.

I have been going out each day since late October 2017, dressing with purpose and having a coffee. In my small journal I might do some art or I might write to get my thoughts out. Recently, I gave myself the challenge (I like a challenge!) of coming up with 20 thins I was grateful for over 5 days, making a total of 100.Over the next weeks, each fortnight, I will share those groups of 20.

Do you practise gratitude regularly?

My 21-40 is here.

I am grateful for:

21.waking up well each day

22. eating breakfast is now about eating for health

23. grass: loving to walk on it barefoot

24. my friends: on line and in real life

25. my inner energy to help others & to give

26. my body bouncing back after major health issues with cancer

27. blue skies in Autumn

28. knowing I am loved

29. my audible account to enable me to listen to books read by authors

30. the universality and equity of twitter

31. books: knowledge

33. my daily newspaper delivery: sadly no longer: had to cancel due to NO delivery.

34. my ability to modify my unhelpful behaviours

35. great growing up years in 1950s and 1960s

36. living by the beach in those years

37. honesty: mine

38. my ability to empathise more now

39. knowing I can ‘delay’ a craving and may no longer desire it

40. Being born Australian

 

I am grateful of course to you, my readers and fellow bloggers and to Min whose link up is called Zen Tips Tuesday and is found here.

Thank you!

Denyse.

 

 

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I Am Grateful Series. 1-20. 54/2019.

I Am Grateful Series. 1-20. 54/2019.

I am grateful every day.

Since learning more about myself, from before, during and after my cancer diagnosis, I know that I am better emotionally when I express gratitude.

I do this in a number of ways.

I will silently think of 5 or 10 things (using my fingers!) that I have been grateful for that day before I go to sleep.

I always express my gratitude to the person who has served me and made me my coffee. There are very few exceptions to this and watching someone’s face light up means the gratitude bounces back I guess.

A few years back I wrote a post about gratitude and how I was keeping a journal then. I am re-posting here what was, and still is, an excellent source about the value of:

GRATITUDE

The social benefits are especially significant here because, after all, gratitude is a social emotion. I see it as a relationship-strengthening emotion because it requires us to see how we’ve been supported and affirmed by other people.

Indeed, this cuts to very heart of my definition of gratitude, which has two components. First, it’s an affirmation of goodness. We affirm that there are good thing in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received. This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.

The second part of gratitude is figuring out where that goodness comes from. We recognize the sources of this goodness as being outside of ourselves. It didn’t stem from anything we necessarily did ourselves in which we might take pride. We can appreciate positive traits in ourselves, but I think true gratitude involves a humble dependence on others: We acknowledge that other people—or even higher powers, if you’re of a spiritual mindset—gave us many gifts, big and small, to help us achieve the goodness in our lives.

from here.

I have been going out each day since late October 2017, dressing with purpose and having a coffee. In my small journal I migth do some art or I might write to get my thoughts out. Recently, I gave myself the challenge (I like a challenge!) of coming up with 20 thins I was grateful for over 5 days, making a total of 100.

Over the next weeks, I will share those groups of 20.

1 to 20.

I am grateful: 

  1. for my life – even now
  2. to be married to the most caring, loving, sensible B.
  3. to be a Mum to a daughter and a son
  4. to have 8 amazing grandkids who love me
  5. for freedom of speech and where I go
  6. for my intelligence
  7. for the career I did really well in.
  8. for my love of teaching
  9. to have the company of little kids as learners
  10. to experience art in my life
  11. to have enough money for much of what I need
  12. for this retired life
  13. to live in a comfy, modern house to live in until at least April 2020
  14. for a regular aged part-pension payments from Centrelink
  15. my advanced and amazing health care
  16. to my team of health professionals I trust
  17. for my blog
  18. for the connections I make on-line
  19. for my memory
  20. To drink coffee: out each day.

Do you practise gratitude?
What are you grateful for today?

Denyse.

Joining with Min for Zen Tips Tuesday here.

Copyright © 2019 denysewhelan.com.au – All rights reserved.

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Courage Is. 48/2019.

Courage Is. 48/2019.

I guess that when it comes down to it, courage is whatever it means to you.

I know I have had to draw on courage in recent years since having cancer and also being anxious during the time of retirement transition.

Each time I did something, as they say, out of my comfort zone, then I was being courageous.

When I reviewed some of my posts and photos I came up with these examples of courage.

 

That’s me….In the prosthodontist chair at Westmead. Having a 1-4 hour session.

 

2015. We left the house we sold and all that was familiar to move to the Central Coast. My courage may have been hiding on many days but “we did it.”

 

In Winter 2017 before my first surgery for cancer, I visited here to connect with the elements and rejoice in what I saw, felt and heard. This was enhancing my mood to add courage to the mix.

 

I love a wave. I used to dive into waves like these. I am now older and some of my courage has been replaced by commonsense. You see, I am wise enough to know, that this beach has rips and ‘older’ people like me can easily be knocked over.

 

After knowing I had cancer and what the surgery would mean I took this pic to represent: one step at a time. This was one of my first examples of courage to help me manage my inner fears.

 

Nothing like a hand to hold when needing more courage. Perhaps also offering a hand to another to garner their courage.

 

2016 Poppy Project in Terrigal NSW for A.N.Z.A.C. Day reminded me over and over of the courage of so many who left Australia to fight wars in other lands. Some to never return, others to return with wounded bodies and souls.

And yet, sometimes we resist. We hold back. We fall into old habits. We know what we have to do but cannot.

Pema Chodron’s words come to mind:

In terms of courage, I think I also learn from meditation, stilling my outer self and paying attention to my inner self.

Of course, I cannot stop the thoughts from coming, but I can now let them go.

Take your time, and get into some times of self-care via a meditation app or just sitting quietly with your hands in your lap and your eyes closed.

Listen…..feel….and take your time.

Each time you do this, you are helping settle an anxious body and mind. It is courageous to actually STOP . Being courageous is not all action-based.

Only you know what is courage for you!

Tomorrow, I will outline my new Wednesday series of posts called Women of Courage.

Please call in again and see what this is about.

Denyse.

Today I am linking with Min for Zen Tips Tuesday here.

On Wednesdays you will find the posts about Women of Courage here and on Thursdays here.

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Updated: What Art Has Taught Me. 45/2019.

Update: What Art Has Taught Me. 45/2019.

The words below, after the photos, are from my blog post of 2017. Before I had a cancer diagnosis. When I “knew” something was going awry with me, but no-one knew specifically. I knew I needed some mindfulness in my life back in 2013. I sure did find it via Art. So much learning for me and I love(d) it. I now know this:

  • art of about the process not the product
  • art in many forms is soothing to my sometime unsure and worried self
  • art is a place and space for me
  • when I visit my art-space, I immediately focus on ONE thing!
  • this one thing, which helps me feel much more relaxed and mindful, may be about what media I will use, what I will make, or what I need to keep on doing
  • it does not matter, the thing is “I become mindful” and settle to create “art”

In 2013 I was searching for more in my life to help me through the bumps and trials.

A friend suggested an art-based group in U.S. where there was an annual challenge.

I’ve written about this a few times on the blog.

Today I am listing what Art has taught me from that mid-point in 2013 until the present.

And it’s not always about Art!!

  • I can be patient
  • I can see the world from different perspectives
  • I can select what I want to do with my art materials with confidence
  • I now know the process is more important to me than the product
  • I find that I prefer to share my art, imperfect as it is, with many and am happy to give it away when people express an interest in it
  • I find it interesting that others see different things in my artistic pursuits than I do at times
  • I enjoy the way in which I became at one with the now when I’m engaged in a creative process be it writing, photography, art or gardening

In general, Art has taught me to allow my mindfulness to be part of who I am. I am no longer striving as much nor wanting to do the next thing. It is teaching me to slow down. 

This is a good lesson to be learned!

Have you learned lessons from life?

I believe it’s a good fit for Min’s link up too. Zen Tips Tuesday found here.

On Wednesday, sharing this post with Sue and Leanne here for Midlife Share the Love.

Denyse.

 

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My Zen Is Found In The Garden. Part Two. 42/2019.

My Zen Is Found In The Garden. Part Two. 42/2019.

Recently I wrote about how I find having a garden is good for my mental (and physical!) health.

However, I must now add, that looking at flowers en masse, individually and observing their colours and textures takes me on an artist’s journey.

I see:

  • patterns
  • tones
  • colours
  • shapes
  • textures

I have tried to replicate some via my drawings and mandalas but nothing quite tops Mother Nature.

I am glad to recognise the peaceful, relaxing and health-filled responses I have when I visit not only my meagre garden but in parks and others’ gardens.

Here’s my collection of favourites. Some were grown where we live now and in pots, others were at the last house. The sweet peas at the bottom were from the last time I grew them. Two years ago. I love sweet peas so I have given them another go this year. Fingers crossed!

Do you find going into the garden relaxing?

Do you notice your breathing slows when you are immersed in nature?

I believe that nature is a healing space and place and I love that!

It cetainly is a place I can re-capture my ‘zen’.

Thanks to Min for her Tuesday link up #zentipstuesday here.

Denyse.

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