Sunday 24th February 2019

Students Need School Libraries. 2018.109.

Students Need School Libraries. 2018.109.

I can’t think that anyone might disagree with the statement:

Students Need School Libraries.

When I mentioned this campaign to assist more of the community to know WHY there even needs to be a campaign, these followers commented on my instagram account:

I loved our library at primary school. Our librarian was rad.

In grade 6, my classroom was opposite the library, best spot in the school!

I was lucky enough to experience amazing school libraries as a kid; they were my havens from bullying and re-charge stations for us introverts.

My kids’ school library is unstaffed and they only go in there once a week.

Looking at high schools recently was an eye-opener too – one school had a traditional library, one a ‘decentralised’ library, one no library at all. They are so undervalued.

Yet, this is now a growing campaign Australia-wide, all areas of schooling, to ensure that schools retain not only libraries for their students but have trained teachers in charge AND…the biggest of all, value the centre, the Library as the entry point of learning and loving all books and reading.

In the late 1980s when NSW Public School K-6 teachers were allocated 2 hours release from face to face teaching…”the allowance of one hour” was to be taken by the teacher-librarian.

It may not have included any lessons about libraries nor having books read. Or borrowing.

I was a principal who had to similarly act in the early years of 2000s and I know that conflicted with my professional and personal views on the value of a school library to students.

The thing about education run by politicians and some bureaucrats is that they “look for how to save money” and…”oh, well, school libraries aren’t that important are they?”

YES. THEY. ARE.

So, my story.

I have always loved reading. See my post here. I also knew I wanted to be a K-6 teacher thanks to the encouragement of my year 5 teacher who went on to become the teacher-librarian. For a few of my teen years, I toyed with the idea of being a librarian instead of teaching, but glad I chose the role I did. Mind you, when I was post-principal years, I got to do some relief teacher-librarian work in a modern school and loved it. Especially reading to the kids. Of all ages!

My daughter’s story.

She began reading at around 3-4 years of age. We did not ‘teach’ her as such but she was immersed in language – written and spoken, along with books once she was born. A somewhat reluctant entry to teaching, she found her feet with classes in Primary School (3-6) and loved her involvement in sporting programs. Over the years, her teacher-life shifted gears when she was offered the chance to be a teacher-librarian for a couple of years at her then school and she relished it. I am not sure the weekends spent at school were always relished but thanks to that success, another opportunity came her way.

A big one. To start a new school’s library. She applied for this and was accepted. Into a brand new (then in 2015) school in Sydney’s north west. She got to buy the first books, set up the physical library and start all the ‘back end’ stuff that takes forever…accessioning, covering and more, whilst getting ready to welcome the new students to the new school. I visited her back then, and it was a joy to see her in her element and some of “my old resources and furniture” in a place where it belonged. I know the school library has changed significantly since then, but considering this only happened within 2 months of school opening (for the first intake of students!) I think it is awesome. No Mum bias.

But, to retain the position, this single mum of 4, had to comply with another requirement. THIS is the reason why it is so important to have properly trained and experienced teacher-librarians. She needed to have a Masters of Education (Teacher/Librarianship) within two years. That, my friends, is a big ask, with some leave from the role to guide her family through some of life’s transitions and some health hurdles to overcome, with an extension granted, she DID achieve this….and she is here, last December, at her graduation. (proud mum moment: she is wearing the same M.Ed cloak I wore for my graduation at Charles Sturt University some decades before!)

From the site: Students Need School Libraries.

Here is what the campaign outlines as its purpose via sample newsletters to parents which is why I am using it here.

 Students Need School Libraries

  • Did you know… that your school library supports your child to engage with a diverse range of books to extend their imagination and develop a lifelong love of reading?
  • Did you know… that school libraries are responsive and collaborative learning spaces that provide students with access to a wide range of resources that are relevant and appropriate to their learning needs?
  • Did you know… that school libraries support your child to reach their potential by teaching them how to become capable researchers and to navigate the world of online information and fake news?
  • Did you know… that teacher librarians hold specialised qualifications as both a teacher and a librarian? Quality library staff are trained to support keen and reluctant, successful and struggling learners.

Students need school libraries. If you are keen to ensure that EVERY child in Australia has access to a quality school library, check out the information available at https://studentsneedschoollibraries.org.au

 

 

Some familiar faces put their words in to the campaign.

What can you, my readers, do?

Support the campaign via your social media options.

https://www.facebook.com/StudentsNeedSchoolLibraries/

https://twitter.com/NeedSchoolLibs

https://www.instagram.com/studentsneedschoollibraries/

Use the hashtag: #studentsneedschoollibraries

Re-tweet (and re-tweet with comment when you see the hashtag on twitter

On Instagram, make your messages of  support too, because they will attract more people to learn of the campaign.

But above all, if you can, do all within your areas of influence to ensure that:

Students Have The Access to School Libraries along with Trained Teaching Personnel.

Thank you, from one very passionate educator, mother, grandmother…that’s me!

Denyse.

Joining with Kylie here on Tuesday for I Blog On Tuesday and On Wednesday I link up here for Midlife Share The Love with Sue and Leanne.

 

 

 

 

 

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September Stories. #3. 2018.95.

September Stories. #3. 2018.95.

This is the third story telling some aspects of what it was like for me as a K-6 School Principal in a medium-sized New South Wales public school from 1999 until the beginning of 2003.

The first story is here and the second here for those who want to understand “how I got to the day I never went back as principal in September 2002.”

What was different in the beginning of the 2002 school year?

It was my fourth year as principal. Naturally much changes within the education system and in schools themselves. Families may move on due to work changes, sometimes those families are not replaced by new ones so a school population can begin heading downwards.

School staff (teacher and executive staff) may need to take leave for reasons of: family needs, maternity and long service leave as well as sick leave.

The other change heralding 2002 was the need to upgrades of maintenance (big cost jobs) to the school as it was one that was first occupied in the 1940s. Back in 2002 it was up to the principal to make the contacts with contracted companies to get in suppliers who could quote for major works. Then the principal, with enough funds in the school account, could give a project a green light. I was trained to teach but there I was, like all principals still, being a site manager and a financial manager as well as HR manager. Sigh.

Systemic Changes.

More and more, I noted as did my principal colleagues that schools were being expected (rightly too) to ensure that Codes of Conduct for staff were not only understood and agreed upon by them but if behavioural issues arose, then the principal would be the first person to begin making an action plan when the code was violated.

There always had been the mandatory notification to the Department back then called Family and Community Services where if a child was deemed by a mandatory reporter (all school staff are) to be ‘at risk’ then a first notification was to be made by telephone. This saw me, often waiting for a person to answer, locked into a phone call because of issues which may look trivial on the outside but may be clues to more. One such event could be repeatedly coming to school with no food. Other times it could be the child letting her/his teacher know that a parent may be unwell or even violent and it was never our role to investigate but we did need to reassure the child, then make the reports. Over the years I have sat in with a child in my role as a support person (if the child requested that from me) and it is heart-aching to be witness.

Our system, the N.S.W. Department of Education, was updating its role in terms of staff compliance and behaviour. This was nothing new and in fact teachers have had annual reviews in a conversation form for decades. Since I left teaching, this has become a joint venture between the schools and the overseeing body of school governance. Returning to my principal days. IF there was a reported incident told to me by a student, parent or staff member where a staff member’s behaviour (spoken, actions or in written form) was not within the Code of Conduct (signed off annually as part of mandatory training) then the principal had to act upon it. I dealt with the Officers from the Conduct Unit first who listened to what had been reported to me and then I was given advice that it could be managed at school level (guess by whom?) or it could be escalated, with the staff member’s knowledge to a higher authority. I had to do this on one occasion and the fallout for me came later. The temporary staff member who brought along a permanent staff member as a support person as the complaint was told to her from my account given to me was aghast at the inference. In fact, there was nothing I had done wrong at all….but remember way back “your role will be to bring this school into the next century” comment by MY boss…this matter was a prime example of how staff thought they could still behave but it was not compliant with the Code of Conduct.

And, Everyone Who Was An Executive Member of the School Went on Leave.

Not at all related to the above in two instances: one was to have a baby and the other because of longevity of service took her rightful allocation of leave…both for the remainder of 2002. But wait, there was one more. Yes, this person ‘broke me’ in so many subtle then obvious ways. And whilst I cannot say much, the continued leave based on medical certificates over and over did cause alarm for the parents of that class as it did me because the year had started well but then, as it was expected of me that this Assistant Principal would perform other executive duties (as do all teaching executive) this person refused and did not return after many months. Oh, yes, one day there was a return, after hours to access my office and computer telling the only person on site, the cleaner, that “I” had given him permission. Following that, he was disciplined and placed in a different school.

How Did That Affect Me?

In some ways it was a relief but in many more, as we geared up for the mid year reports, parent-teacher interviews and then Education  Week along with concerts and fund raisers, it was the beginning of my end. Sadly I did not see it for sometime. I kept on working even harder. Yes. I was doing the roles of the appointed executive who were on leave. I know that I did have three teachers put their hands up to do the relieving roles but without the experience and knowledge beyond their classroom teaching, I was giving more and more of myself to duties that were not mine. I was even writing reports for a class teacher with little experience. I will say now that I know I was over-doing things but I could see no way out. I was under pressure to perform well for the school’s sake and also to answer to my ‘bosses.’ My lovely boss actually retired at the end of Term One (sadly) and he was replaced by someone I knew well but was nothing like the people-person my old boss was.

Schools have a culture of their own. I can now walk into a school and get a feeling of how things are. In my school, as Winter took hold I know that my mood was also one of worry and concern. That was for the school and its staffing into the next year. When school populations decrease in the NSW public system, the principal will be asked to nominate a teacher to leave. In the majority of cases, teachers are very comfortable in their current school and rarely does anyone volunteer. So then it becomes a matter of ‘asking’ and ‘hoping’. The staff were getting the idea that with the school’s drop in population, which occurred when the Special Needs unit was disbanded and there was a reduction of families moving to the area, that “I” had something to do with the reduction. I was told this by telephone on the night (4th September 2002) I heard staff were arranging a delegation to my office the next day. They were going to tell me it was my manner with parents that was the cause. This may have had one essence of truth after I was threatened by a violent father who I had to get removed from the grounds, but generally I had a suppotive P&C and was a principal who was active and even did playground duty. But people like someone to blame. Of course, and that was me.

The Night I Was Told.

Before I go on, I was feeling emotions of overwhelm from the role. I remember with clarity coming back from yet another principals’ meeting where they was MORE that we needed to take responsibility for. I wondered how I could possibly manage more. In the meantime, I became probably hyper vigilant after another meeting about my responsibilities for Work Health and Safety. The school was OLD in many parts and I knew that there was much that did not comply, so I contacted my properties’ manager (the centralised one, not a personal one!) and for a fee, he came out and condemned or ok-ed parts I was concerned about. One such area was deemed so risky I had to tape it off before demolition and in doing so, incurred the wrath of the teachers who had been there forever. I could not take a trick. I stood for what was right because that is who I am. I knew I needed to have a timeout but it happened to be an official one to attend a meeting for a day and then a personal one to accompany my husband to a vital medical appointment.

Schools: I love them. But I Could Not Return To Mine.

Two days away from school…..then I was rung the night before I was to return. Wednesday 4th September. By one of my relieving Executive who I always thought was both compassionate and brave to tell me that some staff were getting a delegation ready along with a Teachers Federation Organiser to meet with me to discuss their issues. Initially I listened with interest and then with surprise/shock at what was apparently my fault: declining numbers, meaning one of them would be asked to transfer. Once I had talked (and been upset a bit) with her, I had successive phone calls from the remaining two relieving executive and it was then I said “I will be speaking to…(my boss) in the morning and will not be returning to school until I have”. They implored me not to but I had the sense not to act upon a threat like this.

I broke. I broke down. I was ill. I couldn’t contact my boss: left a message that I would be going to my GP in the morning.

That would be the start of pretty horrible days but also some days of relief and release. Yet, nothing ever has helped me get over the fact that I loved being a principal but one day I never went back.

There was so much shame in me for that and it has almost all faded now some 16 years later.

It’s been hard to learn THIS….

Next and last story will be about, sadly, how poorly my then employer treated me, but how my own return to wellness was all because of my inner capacity aided by a loving husband, a supportive family and friends network along with..some years later, an inclusive blogging community.

Thank you for your kind words having read these stories. I have not told them in as much detail for many years but I am glad I could have the chance again.

It really helps to write our stories! That is why I blog!

Denyse.

Joining with Leanne for Lovin Life Linky here on Thursdays.

 

 

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Appreciation In August. #2. 2018.72.

Appreciation In August. #2. 2018.72.

This week is devoted to my appreciation of and for public school education*, particularly in my home state in Australia: New South Wales.  It is fitting to post this in Education Week.

A week which helps shine the good and the great things happening in N.S.W. Public Schools today. My family has children at school and they have been visiting the classrooms for Open Day and it has been a delight to see the traditions continue. I recall visiting my now older grandkids’ classrooms , as Grandma even though I was a principal! Of course schools where I worked as a teacher, then Deputy Principal, Relieving Principal and Principal hosted annual events at school and out of school to showcase the children and their education.

My passion for N.S.W. public education is borne of my years of experience as a student aged 4.75 years to 18 years.

My career choice was K-6 teaching and for two years I trained, at Balmain Teachers’ College (1968-1969) to graduate to work in N.S.W. public schools from 1970 until….the last time I actually taught in a school was in 2012.

Mostly public schools are local schools too! Keeping the community connected is so important.

 

Education Week theme

The theme for 2018 Education Week is: Today’s schools – creating tomorrow’s world.

It celebrates how NSW public schools are equipping young people with the skills and capabilities they need to thrive in a rapidly changing, globalised world.

Key messages

Growth mindset

By developing a growth mindset, our students will become lifelong-learners equipped with the resilience to embrace challenges, the aptitude to reach higher levels of achievement and the adaptability to master new skills.

Applied learning

By grounding education in real world learning opportunities, our students are acquiring the capabilities needed to tackle and solve complex issues in the 21st century.

Evolution of the classroom

By creating future-focused learning spaces that integrate advanced technology and promote connection and collaboration, the classroom is expanding beyond the traditional four walls.

Strong relationships

By building strong relationships in our school communities, we are ensuring that every student is known, valued and cared for.

System-wide commitment to innovation and excellence

By placing our students at the centre of all our decision-making, we are continually striving for improvement and innovation so that young people in our care learn in a world-class education system.

Public Schools I Attended:

  • Gwynneville Public School (Wollongong)
  • Balgowlah Heights Public School (Sydney)
  • Manly Girls High School (Sydney)

Off to Gwynneville PS. Our Tunic was Brown (I think!)

Public Schools Where I Taught/Lead.

  • Barraba Central School (North West NSW)
  • Fairfax Public School (North West NSW)
  • Hillston Central School (Western NSW)
  • Weilmoringle Public School (Far Western NSW)
  • Cherrybrook Public School (Sydney)
  • Jasper Road Public School (Sydney)
  • Seven Hills West Public School (Sydney: Rel/ Assistant Principal)
  • Walters Road Public School (Sydney: Executive Teacher)
  • Seven Hills West Public School (Sydney: Assistant Principal)
  • Shalvey Public School (Sydney: Deputy Principal. Rel/Principal)
  • Rooty Hill Public School (Sydney: Rel/Principal)
  • Richmond Public School (Sydney: Principal) – retired. #1st time!
  • Kellyville Ridge Public School (Sydney: R.F.F. Teacher/P/T & English as a Second Language Teacher)
  • Hebersham Public School (Sydney: E.S.L. Teacher/P.T)
  • Kellyville Ridge Public School (Sydney: P/T English as a Second Language Teacher) – retired. #2nd time
  • Hassall Grove Public School (Sydney: Casual Teacher)

Born in August and turning 5 that year, our daughter was able to start ‘school’ as we had a pre-school class too.

As a University Practicum Supervisor/Advisor and Tutor of Master of Teaching subjects, I was in many different public schools from 2012-2015 in both Western Sydney and North Western Sydney. – retired #3rd (and final time!)

Our children attended public primary schools and high schools. Their children have as well. In fact, a lot like history repeating itself, our daughter had her parents as her first teachers when she started school and one of her children had her mother as a class teacher. There was probably an effect of being ‘harder’ on our own children so favouritism did not occur.

Thank you to those many teachers who taught me in my school years. Thank you to the students I learned from as a well as taught in my years as a teacher. Thank you, to all the staff, students and parent communities where I was a school leader for your support, passion and assistance in the quest for the best educational outcomes possible.

I hope Education Week 2018 achieves its goals for all: students, staff and community.

Let this finish what I started!

Denyse.

*this is not to say I do not honour parental choice for their children’s education because I do. However, I continue to believe, as is in the current research that a private school education does not result in a superior education nor result in better results at the end of H.S.  I also believe in a parent’s right to choose a school for a particular cultural or faith reason.

 Today I link with Leanne for her Lovin’ Life linky here.

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Thank A Teacher. #LifeThisWeek 26/52. 2018.53.

Thank A Teacher. #LifeThisWeek 26/52. 2018.53.

It’s coming up to end of first semester or end of term 2 2018.  School holidays are about to commence, or have and are not far off in most states and territories of Australia. I know that folks in the Northern Hemisphere are also on the long school summer vacation.

My old Primary School: I went here and taught here for 2 practice teaching times.

There’s a saying around that ‘teachers have it so good’ :

         9.00 a.m to 3.00 p.m. It is a great career. Look, the hours AND the holidays!

 

 

 

 

 

Do you believe it?

Well, here I am to de-bunk that myth right now!

These days here’s what most teachers are up to in the so-called holidays….

  • attending professional education conferences as attendees and presenters, most often at their own costs
  • planning the work that they will be presenting as part of the beginning of Term 3 called ‘SDD’ or ‘School Development Day’
  • meeting colleagues in schools and other venues to share ideas, make programs and plan for the educational needs of the students in the schools for Term 3 and beyond
  • marking essays, projects, assignments and adding to the program requirements for the term ahead to enable kids’ best learning to occur
  • making most of the child-free environment in their classrooms/halls/libraries and faculty areas to plan, file, cover books, accession records, add information and ‘get the work’ done so that when the kids return the priority is teaching and learning
  • attending to their personal and professional development by working on their portfolios and making plans for meeting the teaching standards as per the Australian Curriculum and their Education Authority.

 

My first…and last photo! This High School was where I attended 1962-67. Then in August 2015 I re-visited and presented for the last time to a professional meeting of teachers.

  • attending Winter Residential schools as they complete their post-graduate courses or degrees. Others may be teaching at Universities which often have holidays outside school holidays.
  • volunteering to help kids in school holiday care settings & camps where they may be paid to supplement wages.
  • One person who is very close to me, completed her Masters In Education (Teacher/Librarianship) over the years during HER school holidays, taking some long service leave to finish the last semester (busy single mother with 4 differing needs’ kids) She also volunteers at a Museum in Sydney in her not-spare time.

My Graduation M.Ed & our daughter’s over 23 years later!

They also make some time, I am hopeful, for caring for themselves physically and mentally by having some time out to personal care, relax, meet with friends and spend time with family as it is important to come back to school well and ready to go and….

Term 3 here we come. but not quite yet..

Maybe when you see your child’s teacher(s) next how about saying ‘thanks!’

My very best wishes to my family and friends who are teachers.

I KNOW how much you needed the ‘break’ and how hard you work.

The ways in which to thank a teacher are many but I always loved those who took the time to tell me face to face or to write it. It was never about the gifts. Always about how I was made to feel. Appreciated.

Once a teacher, always a teacher. It’s in me. I cannot let it go but I also love that too!

End 2009 official last days as a teacher. Unsurprisingly there were a few more!

Denyse.

Joining with Alicia here for Open Slather. She is a teacher too.

Life This Week 26/52. We are HALF-WAY everyone!!

You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today!

Next Week’s Optional Prompt: 27/52. Taking Stock 3. 2/7/18.


 

 

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Starting School Stories. #LifeThisWeek 6/52. 2018.12.

Starting School Stories. #LifeThisWeek 6/52. 2018.12.

For this week’s prompt I am having a trip down a long, winding memory lane of kids (and teachers!) starting school from this retired teacher, deputy principal, principal, mother and grandmother! There are more than a few stories let me tell you but I shall add the few.

For those readers who have just had a child start school, daycare or pre-school this is my annual letter for you…to send to the teacher.

Me as the School Starter.

Back in 1954 I started school after the September holidays. I was 4 years and 9 months. Yes, there were 3 terms for a long, long time in NSW schools. We lived in the same street as the school so I certainly knew where it was. Mum took me on Day 1 and I looked around me at the kids that were crying. “Why” I thought. Anyway, once we got into the classroom I was in love. Up the back was a white full-size rocking horse. I so wanted a ride. I do not remember if I got one, but I do remember liking school a lot and this was fun.

Off to Gwynneville PS. Our Tunic was Brown (I think!)

Our Daughter as a School Starter.

When your parents are both teachers and they are appointed to a very isolated school in NSW with Dad as the (teaching) principal and Mum as the teacher and it’s time to go to school this is what you do. There is no uniform, so you dress in your fave outfit, add a cool bag because you LOVE Abba…and off you trot across the space between home and school called The Playground. You know this place so well but right now there are around 20 different kids you haven’t yet met but eventually you join in their games, called your parents “Sir” like the other kids do and thrive on the independent learning in a small school.

Born in August and turning 5 that year, MIss K was able to start ‘school’ in February as we had a pre-school class too.

The school is on the right of this pic. The tractor is picking up kids from the local Aboriginal community to bring them to school in Term 1 1976 when we had major floods.

Our Son as a School Starter.

In complete contrast to his sister’s enrolment at her parents’ school, he was enrolled to start at the local (now we were in Sydney) large primary school. Having already been to the orientations and pre-school the previous year he was used to the ‘leaving his parents thing’. On the day he began, I was at my school where I was an Assistant Principal but wanted to be part of his start, so I returned to his (soon-to-be) school, met his Dad holding his hand, and down to the classroom we went. Without a backward glance, his nametag already on after Orientation the year before, he entered the classroom, the teacher said “goodbye” to us. That was it. Anti-climactic but at least I was there.

Student Starts School With Entourage.

As the Deputy Principal in a large Western Sydney school it was my role to meet each new starter (not everyone came to Orientation the year before) and their parent(s) to ensure all the relevant details about the child were current and to ask if there were any questions, and welcome the child and family to the school. I allowed around 10 minutes per child and it usually went well.

On one memorable occasion more than the parents entered my office with the child. I saw siblings and I guessed grandparents giving this one small person an overwhelming sense of “woah”. I could see this and asked the family to please stop the photography of me and the filming of the child being enrolled. They did.

But it set a precedent for me as I certainly understood the reason to mark the occasion but with the stressors placed upon a young child beginning school it was enough. No more photos or filming as enrolment took place. Far more important for the child and family to feel welcomed and at ease with this NEW event.

 

Underage Child Found To Have Started School.

At the above-mentioned school before I became the Deputy Principal there had been some lapses in viewing and noting the various documents that needed sighting before a child can start school. There is a requirement that a child cannot start school in NSW Public Schools IF they have not turned 5 after 31 July.

So in the year of my appointment to the school here’s how we (the Kindergarten teachers and I) found we had an underage child at school. One little girl seemed, according to her observant K teacher not able to do some of the gross motor activities which included how to walk upstairs (the school was two-storey) and she had little language and seemed “young”. I made a phone call some weeks into the term to the contact number and her mum answered. I asked outright what the child’s birthday was and the age worked out to be that she was 3. She would not be 4 until later in the year. I explained kindly but firmly that she would have to come and get her child now and that she could start the next year. The mother said sheepishly when she came to pick her up “I hoped you wouldn’t notice her and I didn’t want to find more childcare where I have to pay”. Sad but true.

We had much tightened arrangements for enrolment from then and that little girl did come back the following year and started school successfully.

Today’s School Starters.

For the past few years, the Australian government requires all students to undergo an initial assessment upon enrolling at the school where they will enter… Kindergarten, Prep, Year One (we still have different names for the first year of formal schooling in Australia. Sigh).

In NSW Public Schools it is called Best Start. It is a snapshot on one day of the enrolling student’s capabilities/readiness/knowledge/skills PRIOR to starting formal education. This is a good thing! The students’ baseline is a measurement that is used by the schools and the parents in terms of ‘where is my child at’ and lends itself to support if required or extension or that the child’s progress will grow accordingly in the first year of school.

When ‘Best Start’ happens is up to each school but more and more a child is given a Best Start Assessment in the week before he or she starts school. In fact I have seen this occur for three of my younger grandchildren. Best Start is done with a K teacher (usually) and parents may or may not observe but probably will wait elsewhere for the 40 minutes or so for the assessment. Then the child starts school on a date and at a specific time within the next week. This little one was pleased as punch to have her new school shoes when she came to see us. I sure hope she enjoys wearing them for 5 days a week from Monday 5 February.

 

Handwriting help.

An added bonus to this post. This is an example of the first handwriting children will see and copy in NSW schools. It is NSW Foundation Style. This is the early years’ printing. I used to do this handout when speaking to parents’ groups at pre-schools so they could ‘practise’ themselves. Children learn that capital letters are for names and so on. That is why all capitals is discouraged in early writing.

I wrote this 3 years ago and the message still stands!

What Do You Remember About Starting School?

Denyse.

Joining here with Alicia for Open Slather.

Do link up for Life This Week, I always comment and so do many of the bloggers who join in! We are a very friendly community!

You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today!

Next Week is the optional prompt’: 7/52.  “Who’s a Worrier? 12/2/18.


 

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