Wednesday 12th December 2018

Farewell and Hello. 2018.128.

Farewell and Hello. 2018.128.

Farewell.

In around 2011-2012 (memory fades!) I found a blog on line and one where there was a link-up called I.B.O.T. What the? But I was/am a senior blogger (by age!) and I had to find out more. My blog, back then was a hybrid of education posts, personal posts and photo-centred posts. I was led to Jess (or EssentiallyJess as she became known) site and read that

I.

B.

O.

T.

means “I blog on Tuesdays.”

There was more to this story, I thought so I made enquiries. Jess, in her kindness AND wisdom thought Tuesdays back then were a little light on for link-up parties and she thought of a new link-up with RULES! The rule was the post linked up needed to be a NEW one, not posted before anywhere else, and you needed to get in fast as the link up closed within 24 hours.

You see, there were already link ups in Australia on Mondays, Wednesdays (wordless anyone?), Thursdays were about being thankful and Fridays was a round-up first hosted by Al Tait and then taken over by her sister Bron Maxabella and others. The weekend round up last all weekend. In the years after came more linkups and soon we were spoiled for choice. But Tuesdays remained steadfast: only a blog post published that day and new.

Around 2015-2016 Jess had more on her personal plate than many as she had already begun courses and study which would take her in a different direction, and she reluctantly but gratefully took up Kylie’s offer to take on I.B.O.T.

Now, as happens, life changes, as do needs and directions for blogging vs working and this today, is the last link up for

I.B.O.T. ever.

I will miss it personally and as a blogger. I was part of the team for both Jess and Kylie called #teamIBOT. This was to help, initially, with comments as the link up sometimes got over 100 bloggers!! In recent months, it has reduced to 1/10th and is an indication of blogging changes.

So, to those who have continued to blog on Tuesdays, there are still other link ups here with Sue & Leanne for those in midlife and with Leanne here on Thursdays.

My link-up is returning in 2019 and I look forward to continuing what I like to do best, connect with others!

Thank you Jess and thank you Kylie…and to my fellow bloggers and #teamIBOT members.

Hello!

This is going to wait till next week…..because I want it to have its own space!!

Can you wait?

I hope so.

I will add a hint: I looked like this when I announced my news!

Denyse.

Joining with Kylie here for the final time…and with Sue & Leanne here for, what I hope will be a link up which continues into 2019.

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Observations in October #1. 2018.101.

Observations in October #1. 2018.101.

Observations on Going Back and Memories.

I realised one day recently when I had finished at the prosthodontist that I was ready to go back to re-visit the houses where we had lived in Sydney from 1978 until 2015.

This may not seem much for many readers but for me, I was not able to face doing this for some time.

I was still attached in some ways to the good (and not so good) memories held within those areas where we lived and the three houses which we called “home”.

First One: 1978-1993.

The one we cobbled together as much money as two teachers could, to purchase our first house in Sydney. It was home to three until our son was born the following year. We added rooms, converted the garage to an office and made an oasis out the back with a lovely in-ground pool.

Our daughter had her family 21st birthday there, and left home (the first time) there. I did two degrees via distance in that house from 1985 – 1992, on a typewriter until we got our first computer!

Our son started school from this house and his Dad was medically retired at a too-young age.

We had great friends and neighbours and the reason we sold, we were advised, is that to do more to it we would be over-capitalising.

Second One: 1994-1998.

Oh the way in which banks lent money was too easy. I am not saying they were wrong but it was ‘easy’ for us to borrow given my job and by now my husband has built a sole business in education coaching and cabinet-making. On paper, all good.

Our son was in his teens and we all thought some more space for us all was a winner. We engaged a builder my husband did work for, and with a block of land selected built this architect-designed home.

It was, and still is, a one-off. It was not built out at the back as it overlooked the Village Green and the street was a cul-de-sac of sorts.

Our daughter was married from this home. Our first grandchild was brought here by her parents. Our son left school and worked with his Dad some of the time. I stayed home for some part-time leave and cared for our granddaughter here whilst her mum returned to teaching.

But all was not well and sole business can be a hard way to earn a living and when ill-health struck my husband and we needed the business to cease, then we also needed to take a deep breath and work out what was next…for the following year.

We sold the house to pay out the various loans and it had always been a house more than a home. It looks amazing here but we also remember it held not great time for us and there were 23 steps from the ground level to our bedroom at the top.

Third One: 1998-2015.

In some ways I was not ready to start again but it meant a house for us, and something more affordable and on one level. With a deposit that was not substantial, we managed to afford a house and land package in an area I agree was not where I saw myself living then but it was where we could afford.

This for me, was made better, with distractions of a huge kind like getting my first (and only!) role as a principal and helping with our growing family – grandchildren 2 and 3 joined number 1.

We did put in a pool eventually and we celebrated our son’s 21st here. Our life had changed for the better in many ways but I admit I took some time to adapt.

My husband returned to some teaching roles and unfortunately it was here in 2002 that my career went pear-shaped (which I wrote about here). Families change and grow and ours did too. We made family Christmas memories here and celebrated birthdays too.  The grandchildren, our son’s kids this time, continued to be cared for by us before they started school. All of the grandchildren (then 7) had special pillows, blankies and more for them all “at Grandma’s and Papa’s house”. It was awesome.

I returned to teaching part-time from this place, however, I admit, in 2013-2014 my health took a downturn with a restlessness, and an anxiety-growing over the need to keep working as this house had a mortgage. I was turning 65 and had tired of the relentlessness of working in an environment that I felt  was changing.

We made the joint decision to sell in 2014, but had been leading up to it as my husband was slowly renovating the house inside and out over the years.

The family wanted us to have no more worries about a mortgage as we did too. Our grandkids were sad when we left and have told us since how much that house meant to them. Beautiful kids they are!

We moved on.

As I drove around these three areas I felt quite claustrophobic with the growth of the housing, the trees and the addition  of the NorWest Rail link and even more cars on the road.

Here on the N.S.W. Central Coast, and we are renting. We do not know where or when we will buy but we both know, we need to be within around 2 hours travel back to Sydney, but never to live there again.

Have you moved or moved on and found it challenging, or the best thing you ever did…or something in between?

Tell us more.

Denyse.

Joining my friends here for Leanne’s linky called Lovin Life.

 

 

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Appreciation In August. #2. 2018.72.

Appreciation In August. #2. 2018.72.

This week is devoted to my appreciation of and for public school education*, particularly in my home state in Australia: New South Wales.  It is fitting to post this in Education Week.

A week which helps shine the good and the great things happening in N.S.W. Public Schools today. My family has children at school and they have been visiting the classrooms for Open Day and it has been a delight to see the traditions continue. I recall visiting my now older grandkids’ classrooms , as Grandma even though I was a principal! Of course schools where I worked as a teacher, then Deputy Principal, Relieving Principal and Principal hosted annual events at school and out of school to showcase the children and their education.

My passion for N.S.W. public education is borne of my years of experience as a student aged 4.75 years to 18 years.

My career choice was K-6 teaching and for two years I trained, at Balmain Teachers’ College (1968-1969) to graduate to work in N.S.W. public schools from 1970 until….the last time I actually taught in a school was in 2012.

Mostly public schools are local schools too! Keeping the community connected is so important.

 

Education Week theme

The theme for 2018 Education Week is: Today’s schools – creating tomorrow’s world.

It celebrates how NSW public schools are equipping young people with the skills and capabilities they need to thrive in a rapidly changing, globalised world.

Key messages

Growth mindset

By developing a growth mindset, our students will become lifelong-learners equipped with the resilience to embrace challenges, the aptitude to reach higher levels of achievement and the adaptability to master new skills.

Applied learning

By grounding education in real world learning opportunities, our students are acquiring the capabilities needed to tackle and solve complex issues in the 21st century.

Evolution of the classroom

By creating future-focused learning spaces that integrate advanced technology and promote connection and collaboration, the classroom is expanding beyond the traditional four walls.

Strong relationships

By building strong relationships in our school communities, we are ensuring that every student is known, valued and cared for.

System-wide commitment to innovation and excellence

By placing our students at the centre of all our decision-making, we are continually striving for improvement and innovation so that young people in our care learn in a world-class education system.

Public Schools I Attended:

  • Gwynneville Public School (Wollongong)
  • Balgowlah Heights Public School (Sydney)
  • Manly Girls High School (Sydney)

Off to Gwynneville PS. Our Tunic was Brown (I think!)

Public Schools Where I Taught/Lead.

  • Barraba Central School (North West NSW)
  • Fairfax Public School (North West NSW)
  • Hillston Central School (Western NSW)
  • Weilmoringle Public School (Far Western NSW)
  • Cherrybrook Public School (Sydney)
  • Jasper Road Public School (Sydney)
  • Seven Hills West Public School (Sydney: Rel/ Assistant Principal)
  • Walters Road Public School (Sydney: Executive Teacher)
  • Seven Hills West Public School (Sydney: Assistant Principal)
  • Shalvey Public School (Sydney: Deputy Principal. Rel/Principal)
  • Rooty Hill Public School (Sydney: Rel/Principal)
  • Richmond Public School (Sydney: Principal) – retired. #1st time!
  • Kellyville Ridge Public School (Sydney: R.F.F. Teacher/P/T & English as a Second Language Teacher)
  • Hebersham Public School (Sydney: E.S.L. Teacher/P.T)
  • Kellyville Ridge Public School (Sydney: P/T English as a Second Language Teacher) – retired. #2nd time
  • Hassall Grove Public School (Sydney: Casual Teacher)

Born in August and turning 5 that year, our daughter was able to start ‘school’ as we had a pre-school class too.

As a University Practicum Supervisor/Advisor and Tutor of Master of Teaching subjects, I was in many different public schools from 2012-2015 in both Western Sydney and North Western Sydney. – retired #3rd (and final time!)

Our children attended public primary schools and high schools. Their children have as well. In fact, a lot like history repeating itself, our daughter had her parents as her first teachers when she started school and one of her children had her mother as a class teacher. There was probably an effect of being ‘harder’ on our own children so favouritism did not occur.

Thank you to those many teachers who taught me in my school years. Thank you to the students I learned from as a well as taught in my years as a teacher. Thank you, to all the staff, students and parent communities where I was a school leader for your support, passion and assistance in the quest for the best educational outcomes possible.

I hope Education Week 2018 achieves its goals for all: students, staff and community.

Let this finish what I started!

Denyse.

*this is not to say I do not honour parental choice for their children’s education because I do. However, I continue to believe, as is in the current research that a private school education does not result in a superior education nor result in better results at the end of H.S.  I also believe in a parent’s right to choose a school for a particular cultural or faith reason.

 Today I link with Leanne for her Lovin’ Life linky here.

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Colour T.V. Comes To Australia! 2018.50.

Colour T.V. Comes To Australia! 2018.50.

Australia was late to adopt the television phenomenon compared to many parts of the world including U.S.A. and U.K.

I was born in 1949. No television then. Radio, via a large machine which in our house included a record player, was part of my life as a young kid. Programs were aimed at children were on the A.B.C. including Kindergarten on the Air at 9.30 a.m. daily. We listened to that as kids and then when I was a newbie teacher in 1970 we continued to do so. Loved the interaction between the announcers (including piano, learning a song and stories). It was ‘play school’ for radio and most families and schools had radios!

In 1956 Australia, Melbourne specifically, hosted the Olympics. This was the year, prior to the Olympics in September, that television started in Australia. There were 2 commercial channels at the start – 9 & 7, along with 2, the A.B.C. Black and white T.V. was all we had but we HAD television! Not our family in that year though. Mind you a lady up the street from us in Wollongong had the first T.V. in our street and she invited us kids every Tuesday to come and watch Lassie at 4.00.p.m. How kind.

This image was the first telecast in Australia; Newsreader Bruce Gyngell saying “Welcome to television” on Channel 9.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television_in_Australia

Some people went and watched the news on black & white T.V. and the Olympics in the shop windows at retailers in the main street. I remember this in Wollongong, even though we eventually got television and reception was OK. Many regional areas had to wait for infrastructure.

https://goo.gl/images/Y1mXvY

My family got a B&W T.V. in 1957. It was amazing.

So, that’s what it was. Black and white T.V. We saw the Moon Landing and first walk on the Moon in July 1969 at Teacher’s College. We saw the Vietnam war on This Day Tonight, every night, via B&W T.V. That was what we became used to until…..1974 in Australia.

In 1974 we were witness to the change from black and white television reception to colour. Before that happened however, we needed to do something. Buy a television set which would receive colour. Yes, none of the B&W tvs could do that. We young teachers in Merriwagga were determined not to miss this new technology so we got a loan from the bank to buy a colour T.V. Infrastructure, especially with the national channel, the A.B.C. meant we got that signal at least.

Oh my goodness, they were exciting times! I recall it well. We sat and watched the television move from black and white reception to colour. How fortunate that this clip shows exactly as it happened. THIS was the show in which colour was introduced to Australia. At least where we were, about 45 minutes drive from the nearest big town of Griffith, in the N.S.W. Riverina.

Here is how it unfolded for our family back then. From ABC-TV’s Aunty Jack.

So, now we have so much more than Colour T.V. yet I wonder if anything was really as exciting as these two firsts? Maybe there was the introduction of Pay TV where we naively thought paying for television meant fewer ads. No. That did not eventuate over time. Then of course, there was the ability to record a show and watch it later. We still do this but the technology is different and easier. And then there is streaming shows, via Netflix et al.

I am not a huge television fan but I do know I like the local NBN news and some shows on the A.B.C. My husband enjoys Netflix and sport via Foxtel. Oh, and I like the shows about houses on Foxtel. And another thing, television used to stop ar a particular time of night, and an announcer would say ‘goodnight’ and “God Save the Queen” would be played until it was time for the test pattern.

What are your memories of television when you were younger?

Where did you live and was television (black and white or colour) available?

Come clean, how many T.V.s are in your house. In mine: 4! Two in 2 separate living areas and one in each of our bedrooms. It saves very much on ‘who wants to watch what’ occasions!

Denyse.

On Tuesday this posts links with Kylie here

On Wednesday this post links with Sue and Leanne here

On Thursday this post links with Leanne here.

 

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What Is Friendship? #LifeThisWeek 16/52. 2018.33.

What Is Friendship? #LifeThisWeek 16/52. 2018.33.

When I selected this topic I already knew it may be a challenge to write about.

The challenge though was from my inner meaning of friendship.

I admit that having and keeping friends in the world of teaching has been hard. Why?

It’s because we move around from role to role and school to school. I know as I left work in schools to retire fully, I had hoped to keep connecting with some of the people but over time, the friendship drifted into nothingness. It was also one-sided I found.

Instead of berating myself about this, I looked at my life and why. It WAS about the moving on and about. It WAS also about interests changing too. We had a lot of couple friends as young teachers and enjoyed the company and camraderie, even keeping in touch once we were all back in Sydney. However, family changes and priorities, along with our health and moving away Sydney saw a decline in friendships.

But that was OK. That is life.

Luckily for me, I am social in my outlook and can arrange to meet with people who are on Facebook and that is fun. The friends on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter have made many a lonely time better and I have met so many of these people via blogging I am very grateful.

And, despite the somewhat dated graphic above, when I put out the call on Facebook asking ‘what is friendship?’ I received some lovely and most helpful quotes! Thank you so much, Friends-in-the-Computer!

 

Friendship is surrounding yourself with people who celebrate you, not people who tolerate you. (E.)

Friendship is seeing each other after 18 months and everything is exactly as it was the last time you hung out. (L)

Friendship is comfort and ease, no judgement, just open hearts. (J

 Friendship is never having to be anyone other than yourself. (E)

(And never expecting your friend to be anyone other than themselves!) (E)

Friendship is always having each other’s backs, being each other’s greatest champion and greatest support. (A)

Friendship is everything that’s already been said and also being there through the good and bad, not just a “fair weather friend” if that makes sense. (V.)

Friendship is having the same sense of humour, good discussions (the flippant, the intense, the nonsensical and the hard), reciprocal gestures of support/acceptance of help (if these are imbalanced, the friendship is too), and being the rock of support in there with you without being the rescuer (and again, vice versa!) – give as generously as you receive! (K.)

Friendship is your friend arriving for dinner, and needing a little weep, and that just being part of a great evening together. Ease, love, acceptance, and solidarity. (A)

Friendship is a safe haven for kindred spirits. (V)

I liked these two quotes as well.

What I did love, and miss quite a bit, about friendships back in my working life and semi-retired life was getting together for a lunch, or a coffee date and having a good old catch up. This was fun.

However, I regard myself as fortunate to have married a man I love and who IS my best friend. He and I have seen each other through 47 years of love, triumphs, tragedies, child-rearing, illnesses, house buying and selling, and arguing! Yes, we are opposites in many ways but we are always there for each other!

Having a photo taken is NOT his favourite thing..so this pic is very much about being my best friend AND he has learned so much about photography being my ‘insta husband’ each morning! Thank you, B.

So what are your views on friendships?

Love to hear from you!

Denyse.

Joining with Alicia here – if she is having her link up this week.

You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today!

Next Week’s Optional Prompt: 17/52. School Holidays Memories. 23/4/18


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Sydney Harbour Bridge. 2017.78.

Sydney Harbour Bridge. 2017.78.

Ever since the first time I crossed the Sydney Harbour Bridge as a ten year old in my parents’ Holden I have been in love with it!

Living in Sydney Northern Beaches  from 1959-69 I often went across the Sydney Harbour Bridge on my way to Teachers’ College at Balmain sitting in the front seat of Dad’s car (he worked at Circular Quay). I sometimes caught the double decker bus into the city too. Many at time, I caught the Manly Ferry to Circular Quay and that view from the Harbour of the Bridge was amazing!

As a learner driver I drove across the Sydney Harbour Bridge and over the years it has never phased me at all to drive across the Bridge. Mind you, there have been several changes to the traffic patterns over the years. I still recall handing the coins into the man’s hand at the toll booths and then later, we got to chuck them into the receptacle and wait for the ‘bing’ to proceed.

Now, there are no toll booths but somehow our car’s toll thingy gets read (and debited from our account) and we keep on moving.

Recently we went across the Sydney Harbour Bridge on our way to The Lifehouse for my first but not last appointment to treat my cancer.

Even though I was incredibly worried about the consultation ahead, as my husband was driving, I whipped out the iPhone and captured my Sydney Harbour Bridge.

In the very early part of this century I was fortunate to be invited to do Bridge Climb with my brother, niece, nephew and my dad. It was a very special time and I did not have to pay for the privilege. It is costly that is for sure but well-worth it. I believe there are Bridge Climbs at night especially for the Vivid Festival which is a premier Sydney Winter event. Bridge climb info is here 

Do you like the Sydney Harbour Bridge?

Have you walked/run across the Bridge? I confess I have not!

Have you climbed the Harbour Bridge via Bridge Climb?

Denyse.

Joining Kylie Purtell and Blogging Friends here for I Blog On Tuesdays. There are some new #teamIBOT members on board today, welcome!

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