Tuesday 19th December 2017

Denyse is A ‘Baby Boomer’ Who Blogs. 2017.120.

Denyse is A ‘Baby Boomer’ Who Blogs. 2017.120.

The point of this post is that I wish to be a blogger who connects all with age groups which includes those closer to mine. I am in my late 60s (a Baby Boomer for sure) and want my voice to be heard, and words to be read by a wide range of people. I am blessed to have many people come here to read and connect. I want to have more from the demographic of the over 60s and beyond. How I do that is something I am seeking advice about from you! I would be delighted if you could read this long post and add some wisdom for me to extend my words and pics into a bigger and broader community. I remain very happy where I am to date, but at almost 68 I would like more! Thank you, Denyse. xx

Why I started a blog.

In 2010, at 61, I started  this blog. It was after I had retired (again) from a part-time teaching role in a K-6 school as an English as  A Second Language Teacher. I was ready to be at home with my similarly-aged husband and to help care for some young grandchildren through the week.

I wanted to share my knowledge, skills and passions from education and living life in the senior years with an on-line readership.

It was important for me to connect as I no longer had a social group outside of home once I stopped work.

Twitter, back then, was a great place for conversations and ‘meeting’ people and as @denwise1 I loved it. I made REAL friends from this and as a commenter back then, on a great new site called mamamia, I got a clue that my writing of my life experiences may resonate to help others.

I can now be found on twitter here: @denysewhelan1

I’m also have an instagram account which is private as I was hacked: find me by this name and ask for the follow:  @denysewhelanblogs

The Facebook page for this blog is here.   I have conversations on Facebook as Denyse Whelan Blogs. Over 65 Sharing Stories About Life.

Denyse – post cancer surgery – Sept 2017.

Some history of blogging from me and about Australian blogging too.

In 2011 I went to the first Australian Blogging Conference, held in Sydney, and called Aussie Bloggers. Later in that year I went to 2 other blogging events. I met so many bloggers who remain on the top of my list of blogs now  and they have gone on to make businesses of their blogging: Mrs Woog from Woogsworld, Beth from Baby Mac, Nikki from Styling You, and writers/journalists such as Rick Morton, Donna Webeck, Bianca Wordley, Megan Blandford, Eden Riley and Lisa Mclean. Later at a book launch for Kerri Sackville, I met Lana Hirschowitz, Chantelle Ellem, Kylie Ladd and many more.

In my life as an educator I could never have met people such as these and so my world was widened as a result of blogging. In fact, in 2012 I was selected to Tell My Story at the Digital Parents Conference. The story has evolved somewhat since then, but the esssence of wanting to connect remains.

Why three blogs did not work for me. 

I was pumped in 2012 to mid- 2014 and wanted to be my usual enthusiastic and sharing self. I knew I had skills and knowledge AND experience for families with kids starting school and already at school. Families were letting me know at the meetings I held in pre schools that this was so helpful for them. I knew from my University teaching days interacting with pre-service K-6 teachers I had information and help for their future careers that they told me was great. I also knew I loved sharing both my life, and to an extent my family and back then grandchildren were not exempted by me or their parents. So the 3 blogs!

Ready Set School was one. Ready Set Teach was the second. Denyse Whelan was the third.

Was I busy? Heck yes. Did I have quality content? I thought so but as someone once told me, maybe much of what I wrote about would already be on MUCH bigger sites than mine such as kid spot. It was disappointing that the follow-through promised by the young teachers did not come through either. I had professionally designed and set up blogs, I had a newsletter each month, and I tweeted and facebooked for each blog. It turned out for MUCH more effort and little or no return. I attended Pro Blogger and other conferences. I commented on many people’s blogs and I joined in every.single.link.up. that was relevant.

When I began one blog, found new readers and got my own link-up.

With the interruptions of life for this now 67 year old called: selling a house, renting in a new area to your ‘home’, resigning and retiring from ALL paid work in education, becoming unwell with stress-based illness including IBS, leaving the family we love behind…I KNEW even back in late 2014 as all this was unfolding that I would need to connection and SOMETHING to do each day of my new life.

Back to the one blog along with each and every day and writing as if my life depended on it.

It actually did on some days in early 2015 when I was so sad and broken that the ONLY thing to choose to do was to blog.

I wrote a daily blog post from 1 January 2015 until sometime in November 2016 when it no longer seemed relevant to ‘post daily’. In fact it was freeing and the job of the blog connecting me to more people had been a success via Link Ups.

My link up, Life This Week on Mondays started in early September 2016 and has continued with only 2 weeks break (cancer surgery for me – see here to know more) and usually has about 16 bloggers link. It is a friendly space and I enjoy the interactions and blog reading. On Tuesdays I link an original post to I Blog on Tuesdays and repeat the post in another link up called Lovin Life & that is it for now

Why I want to reach more readers who are ‘baby boomers’.

I love connecting with my current audience of readers, many of whom are also bloggers. These people are in the thirties and forties and I can relate to their lives from my long ago experiences ( I guess) and from what I see happening in my own children’s and grandchildren’s lives. I also connect with those who are blogging about entering the middle years. Those from the over fifties and up. I like what I read there too but still, I have moved past this age as well. What to do? I am not one to sit and wait nor to give up an idea so what I am going to do is post on another day each week about life as someone in the ‘over 65s’ group.

 

Born in 1949 I am a Baby Boomer and this is but one collage from babyhood to this year. Before my mouth cancer surgery.

There is much to say. There may not be a large audience to read nor share but maybe I am calling that prematurely. I am hoping that bloggers who are already part of the link up each Thursday with Leanne here might have some advice after reading this introduction as a linked post.

I would be happy to hear what people (over the age or under it) are interested in reading more about. I do have a lot to add to society and conversations here from an Australian Baby Boomer Blogger (that’s me!) may be the ideal way to do this.

Self-set Challenge to have a photo every day until I turn 68. Making the effort to co-ordinate my clothes even though I go nowhere much at all these days

I hope that this post has made some sense and that you may have some advice for me too.

Thank you for reading!

Denyse.

Joining with Kylie for I Blog On Tuesdays here and with Leanne for Lovin’ Life linky here on Thursdays.

 

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How I Learn Best. #LifeThisWeek 21/52. 2017.71.

How I Learn Best. #LifeThisWeek 21/52. 2017.71.

I am revisiting this post today here with Sammie  for her weekend linky The Ultimate Rabbit Hole on 17.6.2017.

There are some people who like to learn in particular ways and I have always found that fascinating. When I was teaching University students doing their Masters of Teaching I would ask them if they knew their preferred learning style. Some would not until I asked questions such as: “do you want to see everything written to absorb your learning?” (V)

“do you like to talk something through?” (A)

“are you someone who likes to move about, play with the pen and chew it as you are learning?” (K)

Now I understand these are very basic examples of: Visual, Auditory and Kinaesthetic learning styles. Recently there has been some debunking of the theory but as an experienced teacher and parent I still maintain it is important we know our learning styles and therefore get to know the styles of our  family members, class members, colleagues and so on. But why?

C O M M U N I C A T I O N      and   C O N N E C T I O N   with our fellow humans!

Often we use some of each of the 3 learning styles but there is usually a preference for one. My quiz results (from the link below) confirmed what has always been the case for me: I am V.K.A. Visual is waaaay ahead with a score here of 17, Kinaesthetric scored 10 and Auditory was….1. So, I need to see, read, note and often write as a learn. That way I am using my visual style, and adding in the writing I am using the need to move. I have so many notes that are illegible but by writing I have been using two styles to remember and learn. I am also a picture person. I see scenes, words and stories all the time in my head. Visual.

What I learned a long time ago is “not everyone learns or even thinks like I do” this was a shock but actually it showed my ignorance and I have never made that mistake since. I was in a meeting with my office secretary and staff and we were planning and I asked about imagining some scenario that would help our planning move forward. My secretary looked at me blankly and with some gentle probing I was astounded when she told me she had no idea about visualising anything and she was, apparently, a  kinaesthetic and auditory learner.

I never assumed anyone’s learning style from that day! I also know that I am visually oriented first by my love of photography, reading, creating art and so on. I don’t mind music but I cannot listen when I want to concentrate. My husband is more auditory and kinaesthetic with visual last. He always has music on when studying.

This is a link to a quiz from Swinburne University which you (or anyone) can take but it needs to be printed out first. There is also an explanation about the meanings of the learning styles.

VAK Learning Styles Explanation

The VAK learning styles model suggests that most people can be divided into one of three preferred styles of learning. These three styles are as follows, (and there is no right or wrong learning style):

  •  Someone with a Visual learning style has a preference for seen or observed things, including pictures, diagrams, demonstrations, displays, handouts, films, flip-chart, etc. These people will use phrases such as ‘show me’, ‘let’s have a look at that’ and will be best able to perform a new task after reading the instructions or watching someone else do it first. These are the people who will work from lists and written directions and instructions.
  •  Someone with an Auditory learning style has a preference for the transfer of information through listening: to the spoken word, of self or others, of sounds and noises. These people will use phrases such as ‘tell me’, ‘let’s talk it over’ and will be best able to perform a new task after listening to instructions from an expert. These are the people who are happy being given spoken instructions over the telephone, and can remember all the words to songs that they hear!
  •  Someone with a Kinaesthetic learning style has a preference for physical experience – touching, feeling, holding, doing, practical hands-on experiences. These people will use phrases such as ‘let me try’, ‘how do you feel?’ and will be best able to perform a new task by going ahead and trying it out, learning as they go. These are the people who like to experiment, hands-on, and never look at the instructions first!People commonly have a main preferred learning style, but this will be part of a blend of all three. Some people have a very strong preference; other people have a more even mixture of two or less commonly, three styles.When you know your preferred learning style(s) you understand the type of learning that best suits you. This enables you to choose the types of learning that work best for you.There is no right or wrong learning style. The point is that there are types of learning that are right for your own preferred learning style.Please note that this is not a scientifically validated testing instrument – it is a free assessment tool designed to give a broad indication of preferred learning style(s).More information about learning styles, personality, and personal development is at www.businessballs.com.With acknowledgements to Victoria Chislett for developing this assessment.  Swinburne University.

I chose this prompt today because it is relevant for us all.

It is good to know what your preferred learning style is for any given situation, even cooking!
And if you are a parent it is important to realise that your learning style may not be your children’s and then that can maximise understanding and minimise conflict!
So, do you know ‘how you learn best?’
I hope this has been a helpful post!
Denyse.

Thank you for being part of Life This Week.

Joining with Alicia here for Open Slather and Kell here for Mummy Mondays.

Here are the rules for the link-up “Life This Week” is a link up that runs every Monday and remains live for until Thursday at 5 p.m.during that week. * You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today! Do come back next week. Next week’s prompt is “Hobbies”.

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Thanks Mr Duffy. 2017.66.

Thanks Mr Duffy. 2017.66.

A long time ago, blogger, now writer Catherine Rodie, asked for people to respond to this for a series of blog posts when Catherine had her blog:

“if you could, who would you like to have a cup of tea with?” The original post was “A Cup of Tea With Mr Duffy”.

Today I have refreshed the post, to add it here, for the first time on my blog.

Enjoy!

The classroom on the left was my Year 5 room and also where I did my first teaching prac. The coloured building in the background was the library. Taken on a trip back to the school in 2013.

I gave some thought to who I’d like to have a cup of tea with, it was an obvious choice.

Mr Duffy.

It would need to be at 11.00 a.m. on a school day in the Balgowlah Heights Primary School staffroom. That is a room at the end of the wooden building closest to the headmaster’s office where Mr Piper rules via a loud voice and a stern manner.

Walking up the wooden steps and holding onto the rail, I can feel the timber underneath the flaking paint. I notice that the school hasn’t had the public works painters in for a while. As I reach the verandah, a smell emanates from the left, as does the plume of grey. Of course, teachers can smoke in the staffroom! And in the playground. But not in the classroom. It IS 1960!

Slowly moving towards the screen door, I hear the words “oh Ian, you were great last week with the cricket team those boys really go well against Manly West.” Then as I raise my hand to knock and ask if Mr Duffy is there, Mrs Ridley rushes up and wants to know “what do you want Denyse Simpson, we are having our cups of tea?” I reply, “I am here to see Mr Duffy if he’s here.”

“Greg, that girl from your class who likes helping in the library is here, Denyse Simpson, can you see her?” I stepped back and waited near the verandah’s rail and the door swung open. It was Mr Duffy. “Who are you?” he said looking puzzled, “I was told Denyse Simpson here, and I can see she is not.”

“Mr Duffy” I say quietly, and watch as he lifts his cup of tea from the saucer as I can tell he’s thinking how much time till the bell rings and recess is over. “I was Denyse Simpson, and you were my teacher..but now I’m Denyse Whelan and I’m a teacher too.”

And that’s  when I to reassure him right away of my reason for visiting at the time of his “cup of tea” at Recess. I pull out my photo of me in Grade 6 and point out that he, Mr Duffy, had been the one teacher in my primary school years who had seen the qualities of a teacher in me. The way he encouraged that was to appoint me as the chief library prefect in Grade 6 where I continued to learn about how it is to teach and learn.

The bell rings. Cup of tea drained. Mr Duffy shakes my hand and says “well, that’s been nice to know” and leaves. I look at this man, within this school setting and remember with great affection why I became a teacher. I know too, that he is a modest self-effacing man & he’s a bit embarrassed by my words.

I returned to my old school and classroom in 1968 to do my first teaching practice and loved it! Mr Duffy had retired by then I think. I was made to be a teacher and Mr Duffy helped me realise that!

The list of schools in N.S.W. where I was a teacher, school executive and principal.

Update: I am now retired from all work in teaching but will always be interested in why people choose teaching as a career. This post reminds me of what I did! 

My husband, also now a retired teacher, and I met in the country teaching days and last week he went back to one of his schools, where I also taught after him. Here’s a photo of Fairfax Public School….and the classroom where I taught kids from K-2 in one room in 1971-72.

Do you have fond memories of a teacher from your school days?

Have you ever said thanks to someone who may have inspired you to choose a career?

Adding a P.S. I’ve just read over at Sammie’s blog this: about marrying a teacher! We are married teachers, me and hub, so that makes us..happy!!

Young Married Teachers and their first born!

Denyse.

Joining with Kylie Purtell and friends here for I Blog On Tuesdays.

On Thursdays I link with Leanne and friends here for Loving’ Life.

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Proud to Be Public. 2017.63.

Proud to Be Public. 2017.63.

I’ve been a proud supporter of public education since 1954 when I started school in Gwynneville.

I even recall turning down the opportunity to attend a private girls’ school for my high school years in Sydney.

I am not sure of what kept me so loyal to public education but from the time I joined the ranks as a professional I stayed with that loyalty.

Do not get me wrong however, as I also believe in parental choice for schooling.

I just preferred both the system I knew and was proud of for our children’s education as well as where I worked.

Now, one time I have been particularly proud of public education in NSW is when the MAJOR live event called The Schools Spectacular is on.

From the mid 1980s until the NSW Government determined to change the buildings and surrounds at Darling Harbour, the ‘school spec’ was held at the Sydney Enterainment Centre. We first attended in its second year, and from then on, every few years and when grandchildren were part of the multi-thousand casts from NSW schools I was there!!

A most poignant attendance for me was my last one. In November 2014 we already knew we were moving away from Sydney and family. It was the last chance to attend a Schools Spectacular at the EntCent so knowing I had my eldest granddaughter in this one it was important. I took one granddaughter who would be starting school the following year, and on the day, met up with my daughter (a teacher in NSW public schools too) and two of her kids (two more of my lovely grandkids in their teens).

We got to see this. I watched it again last week and knew I had to share it.

The person playing the Army Nurse (red cape, and at the end in the coat) is my eldest granddaughter. The first two of the young men playing soldiers are friends of hers from then school. This is 2014 and they have all left school now. My granddaughter and her friends were part of the NSW Public Schools Drama Ensemble and this the reason for their inclusion.

My granddaughter was in top 10% for drama that year in the HSC, and after her gap year, auditioned and was accepted into AFTRS (Australian Film Television and Radio School) where she is now in the second year majoring in film production.

Grandma is very proud to introduce Jessica Gosling!

And, this talented young woman has started something different..for women, about women. Here she is,

. Her channel on YouTube explains it all. Go!

So, this is one more reason I am proud to be a supporter of Public Education!

Have you ever been to the Schools Spectacular?

If you want to know more: here is the link to the page.

It sets records for the largest number of performers around the world I believe!

Did you attend concerts at the Sydney Entertainment Centre?

Denyse.

Joining friends who blog on Tuesdays, here with Kylie Purtell.

I think that Leanne will enjoy this post too…and I am joining her and other bloggers for Lovin’ Life Linky here. 

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Casual Teacher Ready To Teach! 2017.48.

Casual Teacher Ready To Teach! 2017.48.

I developed a ‘classroom-in-a-box’ for my first day back teaching in a classroom after some years in June 2012.

I am a K-6 teacher who likes to be prepared for all contingencies – ok, I am ‘over-preparer’ – because as a former K-6 principal I know that casual teachers cannot necessarily be guaranteed to:

  • know exactly what class or grade they will take even though they might have been engaged to teach a particular one because between the time of engagement and the reality of that school day, plans might need changing
  • have equipment and resources for a day in the classroom made available to them, particularly if it’s not been known that the teacher they replace was to be absent
  • be given any guidance or plan for the day as schools are incredibly busy and dynamic places
    get a chance to do any kind of preparation on arrival at school, e.g. photocopying etc.
  • So, what went into my (self-titled) ‘Classroom In a Box’?

This post brought back memories of sharing these photos as slides to the new and upcoming teachers who were students I tutored back in 2013 and 2014 at a Sydney University. If anyone reading here wishes to use any of my ideas or the photos they are copyright free by me for personal use by teachers.

Denyse.

Linking up with Kylie Purtell and friends here for I Blog On Tuesdays. I hope you’ve enjoyed my education and schooling posts over the years! See below:

News from Denyse:

I have LOVED presenting posts about education and schooling here each Tuesday since January 2015. In fact there have been more than 100 original posts!! Before then I also linked up to I Blog On Tuesdays from 2012 onwards whenever I had a new post. I am reducing my blogging output now and I will be only posting on Tuesday intermittently. I will continue to be a blog reader and commenter as past of the I Blog On Tuesdays team. This is not saying goodbye but I am taking care of myself and blogging less! I wrote about why here.

 

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Creative Learning. 2017.42.

Creative Learning. 2017.42.

My Tuesday posts have been about Education and Schooling since I started the new look blog in January 2015.

I am branching out today to write about what I have learned about being creative. I am educating myself!

In the past I might have given myself a go at some art or some kind of scrapbooking or even some making craft.

I did classes and I liked some of what I learned.

But I learned something about myself. It was that I don’t actually enjoy a formal lesson because as soon as I had them I found my creativity drying up. No-one actually criticised me I guess except myself. I did not measure up to what I thought a product should look like.

Until 2013.

I was enjoying playing with art and craft (an old Infants teacher never forgets doing that with little kids!) with my grandchildren but I felt I needed more. Then I was introduced to a website here and fun challenge called Index Card a Day.

 

Fast forward to 2016 and I discovered another love. Making mandalas. It was a match made in creative heaven. I had bare minimum of a lesson via a book, and got some materials and then I let my creative self take charge.

This is why I now love my creative learning. It is self-paced. I am not afraid of sharing because I already like the process and the product is secondary.

Taking the pressure off has made the world of difference! I can see that this is something that may affect others who are creative in terms of art, music, drama, writing and photography.

Has something like this occurred for you or someone you know?

Denyse.

Joining Kylie Purtell and bloggers here who blog on Tuesdays.

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Post from The Archives. 2017.38.

Post from The Archives. 2017.38.

In 2012 I was blogging in a number of different fields and one was education based. On this occasion I wrote a lengthy post about how I became a teacher in the late 1960s. So much has changed since then, in many cases ‘not for the good.’ Whilst teachers now have to complete at least a Bachelor’s Degree and add a Masters in some cases, there is far less emphasis in the subjects that will be taught and how to teach them. We had to study every one of the subjects and areas of knowledge we would be using in teaching.  The first kids I ever taught would now be in their mid-late 50s. How scary is that!

If you read on, and through the details, I would love to know what your experiences of teachers may have been when you were in primary school.

Denyse.

Joining here with Kylie Purtell and friends for I Blog On Tuesdays.

DENYSE becomes A TEACHER.

I was the first cohort of students to complete the Higher School Certificate in 1967. Once passed, I was then offered a Commonwealth scholarship to the new Macquarie University to do secondary teaching. However, my passion was with the younger children, and I waited my time & received a NSW Education Department Scholarship to study Primary School teaching at Balmain Teachers’ College.

This was the beginning of the biggest population explosion in outer Sydney, and there were a number of teachers’ colleges set up rather quickly after the 1960s to cater for a huge rise in kids who needed teachers! The first year of training was general primary school, and then in second year we could choose  – Infants (mine) Primary or Small Schools (an option only for men, and my husband chose this one when he was at Armidale Teachers’ College)

The scholarship paid me $22 a fortnight, and I signed a bond to teach anywhere in NSW for a period of 3 years after fulfilling training. I attended the full-time training program for 2 years, completing 18 subjects.

We were taught how to teach & these subjects:

english, mathematics, social studies,natural science, writing, reading, physical education, music, drama, speech, spelling, art, craft, listening, library, child behaviour, handwriting, psychology of child development.

We had practical assessments which included:

telling the class of other teacher trainees a ‘story’, showing them a picture & eliciting responses from questions we had carefully planned, demonstrated dancing and gymnastic techniques, made craft objects step by step,

We had 18 examination subjects over 2 weeks at the conclusion of the two years. There had been a series of exams in first year too.

We were placed in four different teaching practice schools where we were supervised by the class teacher, and we were supervised by personnel from the Teachers College. We needed to teach in different class types and schools. I taught Year 3 and Year 2 back at the Primary School I attended. I was also a teacher on Kindergarten in the northern beaches, and a Year 1 in Neutral Bay.

The School I attended for Yrs 5 & 6 and where I returned for 2 ‘pracs’. I got to re-visit in 2011.

We needed to write full lesson plans, and then teach to them, and evaluate them. We needed to mark the work of the students, keep the children under control, and do the other duties expected of the classroom teachers. We were able to write a shorter version of our day book once we were deemed as a pass for practice teaching. The lesson plan books were huge, and each night would involved writing out the entire day, and then getting the lessons ready, and arriving at school in time to let the teacher run an eye over it. There were no stencils as such.

There was a requirement for me, a left-hander, to learn how to write on the blackboard with chalk using only my right hand. Without practice (and I had to do lots) and then passing the practical examination I would not have been allowed to teach. Each teacher-to-be in New South Wales had to score 100% on a spelling test based on Year 5-6 words. We all had to pass a musical ability test of playing an instrument (recorders were very popular) and singing a solo in front of the group and teacher. We had to pass a practical mathematics test with the ‘new and revolutionary’ Cuisenaire Rods as they would form the practical teaching tools in Maths in the Infants Classroom.

After the exams were finished, our results were posted on a board. In the grounds of the teachers’ college. Then another list went up, the schools we had been appointed to. Beforehand I recall a talk given by the NSW Department of Education officers who advised us about superannuation. We were all appointed by the Department of Education anyway, but there was a tiny detail on the super forms. Women got to tick age 55 or age 60 for retirement benefits. I ticked 55. It turned out four years later, as a married woman to another teacher that I was able to “opt out” of super, and to my regret I did.

I was given a teaching post to Barraba. Not in Sydney. Not in the newly formed outer suburbs called as a collective Green Valley. I was going to a Central School – K-12 and it was a good 6 hours from my parents’ home in Sydney, and I was pleased. I was going to a new place, close to where the current BF was working (not the hub) and my parents drove me to Barraba at the end of January 1970, for Miss Simpson to start her teaching career. Firstly we needed to suss out a place for me to live, and on hearing from the school’s deputy that there was a vacancy in a teachers’ share house nearby, I was in! The next day, 27 January 1970 I began paid work as a teacher on a K/1 in the Infants Department.

That is how I became qualified to teach in New South Wales schools run by the Department of Education.

 

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School Kids’ Progress T1. 2017.34.

School Kids’ Progress T1. 2017.34.

Around the middle of first term at school this experienced Primary School teacher/principal (and parent/grandparent) predicts ten things may be true…and they may also be for those first timers, the ones whose kids have just started school. 

Are you ready for this?

ONE: Your child will quote the ‘teacher says’ and be adamant that all the ‘teacher says’ is right.

TWO: Your child will call you by the teacher’s name at least once. Conversely your child will also call the teacher “mummy/daddy” at least once.

THREE: The school uniform items (shoes, hats, jumpers) you lovingly labelled – in laundry marker AND an iron-on label for good measure will still “get lost”.

FOUR: Having spent money on new items as above because “no hat no play,” rules are enforced, the “old” item will miraculously turn up.

FIVE: There will be one week where you will promise your child that he or she can have some money to spend at the canteen and your child will buy something you have never heard of called a “zingy zong healthy treat something” and your child declares it ‘best food ever.’

SIX: The school newsletter will have news about how well the new children have settled into their new routine at ‘big’ school and you think ‘erm, but I have noticed’ at least one child crying as they are led by the hand into class each day. Life at school.

SEVEN: You are glad to know this is not your child -this time! You also feel a great deal of empathy for the new K/P kids and their teachers as settling into something as new as school is hard – for everyone!

EIGHT: The school will send home a note about a mufti-day to raise funds for a special cause and somehow, along the communication route, you forgot and your child arrives in school uniform that day…but luckily her/his sibling is in the car and of a similar size so a ‘quick change’ occurs leaving a puzzled sibling wondering if he or she is going to school now too.

NINE: You are just beginning to realise why school is good for the kids when you see how much time you have for all the things you want to do …. this is a cheeky point…just seeing if you are reading LOL.

TEN: You will look closely at your Kinder/Prep child’s face as you kiss him/her goodnight  and wonder, “where did my little one go? I now have a school kid!”

So half-way(ish) through Term One, congratulate yourselves parents! You are getting there…right?

Tell me how it’s going with your school-age children? High school too!

Denyse.

Linking with almost seasoned school mum Kylie Purtell here for I Blog on Tuesdays.

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