Monday 21st October 2019

Eating After My Gum Cancer Surgery. Part One. 2018.18.

Eating After My Gum Cancer Surgery. Part One. 2018.18.

I thought it may be of interest to readers if I outlined how I have been able to ‘feed and nourish myself’ since last year when my cancer was cut from my upper mouth, gums and jaw and I was left with…not much! Actually it was a miracle of science how my upper mouth was made from my leg and there is much to be read here for those who do not know my story.

In the months leading up to my eventual cancer diagnosis my upper gums made eating difficult as they were sore, and with a new denture it was hard work. I guess in some ways it was practice for what was to come. I could not really crunch or bite down on something like an apple or chips. I could have smaller cut up bread-rolls but not bite into one. Mmmm. I had forgotten this and now I am writing it I can see why I could not even eat steak or a cutlet. Foods I cannot eat now but am longing to have again!!

Happy Snap?: my 67th b’day: 30/11/16. Upper teeth seen are those made by a bridge/crown over 5 of my front teeth. My mouth was already irritated in the back of this area. Had been for at least 2 years.

 

I recall being quite concerned about how I would deal with feelings if I could not eat. Yes, I like to do that..and, over time, found that I still can but I am actually dealing with feelings better than I used to! Who knew!

After surgery on 6 July. I was told I would have a drip and a feeding tube inserted naso-gastrically and that I would not have any liquid until at least 7 days were up so that the area that had been added to my inside of my mouth was deemed to have sealed and be ready. OK. I did not argue but I did not like the feeling when the feeding tube would fire up and deliver the prescribed nourishment. In fact I used to think it might be regurgitated but it never did. After I left ICU and was in my own room, the amount I was fed ramped up and I had to change my attitude towards this feed. I decided I could deal with the amount of time – up to a few minutes it took to feed me because it was helping to heal me.

Feeding Me To Heal Me became quite the mantra which I used a lot at home too. My psychologist had told me that patients who have head and neck surgeries have a changed relationship with food and that it cannot always be enjoyable as it is like a medicine we need to heal.

I came home on the 10th day and my dear husband already had shopped with the list of what he knew I could eat and we thought: YES, we have got this! Not so. You see, as the patient who was still very much learning to eat again, I thought I could direct my husband to sort out the food I could eat. It did not work well as I was still highly emotional, on a very strong anti-biotic to ensure my leg wounds did not become further infected. In short, adjusting to eating when I couldn’t really eat (and was hungry) and found that my gut was rejecting everything via diarrheoa meant my early days (and nights at home) were a bit challenging. And I was wanting to do stuff for myself. My goodness. I know.

My hospital dietitian had sent me home with samples of high protein drinks, I was given sheets with lots of information about soft and pureed foods and I am a compliant person. I must do this. Right? Well, actually my body said NO. My GP told me just how much I needed to let my (IBS-centred) gut settle after being empty for over 8 days and it needed to come back to balance. His sensible approach saved me and whilst I appreciated the knowledge that was shared with me it was time to eat what I could and when I could.

I admit that with having my right leg encased in a boot and the stitches from surgery had only just been removed as well as two large flesh areas that needed healing I did my body no favours by deciding to make some chicken and vegetable soup one morning. You see, I have always been the cook and I found that if I had to instruct my husband our marriage might not last (OK, an exaggeration) and I needed some sense of independence.

Once I had that soup sorted and blended and in the freezer for future use, I agreed to stay out of the kitchen…and my darling husband became the best every toast maker and cutting it into teensy tiny pieces to see if I could eat it. He even made me vegemite toast just so I could lick the taste of it. I learned that yoghurt and honey go down easily and they helped me when I had to take oral medication as did jelly.

The early days and weeks were hard but I was also buoyed by the fact that in all likelihood my cancer had been completely removed. On a follow-up visit 3 weeks after surgery both the Professor and the Associate Professor agreed with no recommendation for follow-up radiotherapy as it has very brutal effects on the face and would change the view of cancer has gone from 95% to 97.5%. 

Part Two will be more on how I gradually learned more about the how and what I could eat…and how it is so vital that we both nourish ourselves with food as well as enjoy it.

If you have any questions, please ask in the comments. Happy to respond.

Denyse.

Joining in with Kylie Purtell here for I Blog On Tuesdays and with Sue here for her Wednesday link up & Leanne’s Lovin’Life Linky on Thursdays here.

 

 

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest