Friday 19th April 2019

Your Moral Compass. 33/2019.

Your Moral Compass. 33/2019.

Wisdom Helps Develop a Moral Compass.

This post’s content is over 4 years old and was originally posted by me. In recent months, despite my zen-type practices and holding a greater sense of awareness of what I CAN do something about and what I cannot, I have become increasingly concerned about whether there is an understanding of what it is to have AND use your moral compass. What’s the way in which you live your life and go about each day?

For some people it’s a faith-based life.

In others, it’s an inner way of being, doing and living.

Then I ask you, dear reader, do you follow your moral compass?

Is the answer yes, or maybe or depends or no?

Let me offer my view.

Without my moral compass I would have made and continue to make decisions that have been destructive or illegal or just plain hurtful to myself and others.

I have no specific events or tales to tell here. But I do know I listen to and feel my ‘moral compass’ and let myself consider things all the time in this way.

However, if you are not ‘feeling’ or ‘knowing’ what your moral compass is for or about, then you may be finding that life is not working so well.

My advice in life is this:

Listen to your heart.

Feel things in your gut.

Ask yourself…’does this seem right’

BE TRUE TO YOU and YOU WILL BE OK!

Here’s what some others said about “a moral compass” as I updated this post for the “now” of 2019.

I have learned that as long as I hold fast to my beliefs and values – and follow my own moral compass – then the only expectations I need to live up to are my own. Michelle Obama. 

Sometimes, in order to follow our moral compass and/or our hearts, we have to make unpopular decisions or stand up for what we believe in. Tabatha Coffey.

Never jeopardise who you are for a role. Now, I’m not saying you should never change for a role, because the fun of being different characters is adapting different nuances and different parts of the character, but never jeopardise your moral compass or anything like that to have a role. Yara Shahidi.

Today we are engaged in a deadly global struggle for those who would intimidate, torture, and murder people for exercising the most basic freedoms. If we are to win this struggle and spread those freedoms, we must keep our own moral compass pointed in a true direction. Barack Obama.

I try to have the right thing happen at the end of the case, try to have the case have a moral compass to it, try to do a little teaching while I’m at it because that’s the, you know, that’s the preacher in me. Judy Sheindlin.

You have to follow your moral compass: it’s a good guide of telling you what is right and wrong. Cailee Spaeny.

Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/search_results?q=moral+compass

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Do you get the feeling not everyone uses or chooses to use their moral compass?

Have you come across someone whose moral compass seems to be very mis-aligned with your values and ethics?

I know I have from time to time and it makes/made me very uncomfortable. The “opposite” of zen!

Meanwhile, to get myself ‘back to balance’ I continue to do these:

*art of some kind every day

*get out in nature, either in my own backyard or by the beach or river

*see the ‘good’ in others……really look for it and you will see it too!

So, joining with Min today, as I can’t be letting this topic go….and her place on-line on Tuesdays is meant to be ‘zen’ tips. Maybe the one tip I could add, is “have YOU looked at your moral compass recently?”….to our leaders, politicians and all those who have the power to change…..

Denyse.

 

 

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On Being Human. 30/2019.

On Being Human. 30/2019.

It’s the strangest thing, this being human.

One day we think we have this dealing with life sorted….

Then….one thing or many may change that so-called certainty.

The book by Leigh Sales: Any Ordinary Day seeks to explain and find out more about this life of ours.

Buddhist nun, Pema Chodron, and her many books and teachings are in my library now.

I had this book beside my bed and read one chapter a night before I knew I had cancer.

This excerpt is from chapter 14.

According to the Buddha, the lives of all beings are marked by three characteristics: impermanence, egolessness, and suffering or dissatisfaction. Recognising these qualities to be real and true in our own experience helps us to relax with things as they are.

The first mark is impermanence. That nothing is static or fixed, that all is fleeting and changing, is the first mark of existence. We don’t have to be mystics or physicists to know this. Yet at the level of personal experience, we resist this basic fact.

It means life isn’t always going to go our way. It means there’s loss as well as gain. And we don’t like that.

We know that all is impermanent; we know that everything wears out. Although we can buy this truth intellectually, emotionally we have a deep-rooted aversion to it.

 

Are we ever certain of anything, really?

No, just the next breath in and then out we learn.

This has been attributed to the Dalai Lama…..

“Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.
Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”

 

 

The time is NOW. This is all we have.

https://steemit.com/psychology/@keysa/the-power-of-now-the-book-from-eckhart-tolle-that-changed-my-life-a-talk-about-the-ego-of-man-the-future-destructive-thoughts

So many of us, and I put my hand up here, have thought we CAN control what is going on for us in life.

As those who are wisest say, the only thing that IS certain is uncertainty.

But in saying this, there is a kindness too. In this poem attributed to Rumi, I have found comfort in the words during my tougher times of stress, anxiety and of course, recovering from cancer.

The Guest House

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
As an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still treat each guest honourably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

— Jalaluddin Rumi, translation by Coleman Barks (The Essential Rumi)

Finally, something from a recent newspaper clipping. I sometimes do  not agree with Michal Leunig’s words, but this time, for me, he has nailed it.

On Being Human is what we can, be and do each day (and night) to remain well in body and mind. Whilst this can be tough, each of us probably already has some ideas and practices which work. These are those for me:

This is another post, written with self-care in mind and also to relate to the theme of bring mindfulness and more ‘zen’ into our lives.
I hope there is something helpful for you here too.

Tell me more about what your thoughts are “on being human”.

Denyse.

Linking with Min who blogs here for Zen Tips Tuesday. Her guest writers come from all over the world and provide unique and helpful perspectives.

 

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