Wednesday 18th July 2018

My Home Country. 28/52. #LifeThisWeek 2018.58.

My Home Country. 28/52. #LifeThisWeek 2018.58.

I do ask myself when a particular prompt comes up ” why did I choose this?”

I have no real answer except I thought it may be interesting to see what others write.

In my case I was stumped! Then I delved a bit deeper to realise that even though my home country is Australia there are more countries than this one in my history.

Let’s get started!

I was born in Wollongong, New South Wales (N.S.W. for short), Australia to a father who had also been born there and a mother who was born in Dapto N.S.W., Australia.

An oldie: Mum and Dad with me: 1999 becomes 2000

 

Easy? Not quite.

I did some history searching after knowing some of parents’ heritage and found this out.

Aboriginal Australia.

My mum’s family was a rural one from various places in southern N.S.W. and I could see her heritage was from generations born in Australia too. What is not noted but has long been suspected is that there is Aboriginal heritage from Mum’s side of the family and that includes me. In the 1800s not all births were registered and if there had been a liaison with a ‘white’ Australian for example, with a person of Aboriginal descent, then it was unlikely to be recorded.

I feel proud to know this may be some of my heritage and it makes sense to me over the years why. Teaching and living in remote and Western Sydney communities I have felt an affinity with the original Australians.

The symbolic meaning of the flag colours (as stated by Harold Thomas) is: Black – represents theAboriginal people of Australia. Yellow circle – represents the Sun, the giver of life and protector. Red – represents the red earth, the red ochre used in ceremonies and Aboriginal peoples’ spiritual relation to the land. source: Wikipedia

English Heritage.

My Dad’s mother was English-born and came to Australia to marry her Aussie groom following World War I. My grandmother and her mother (she followed her daughter to buy the family a house and live in it with them till her death in 1957) remained “very English”. Gran always talked about going “home” and I am sad to say it never happened. She was a sad lady because she missed her home country and the marriage was a hard one as she ended up as a mother to four in the Depression of the 1930s. In fact, her sadness turned to anger when her husband was killed in a workplace accident and she raised those children alone. Not quite, but she held a grudge about her life’s lot till she died in 1985.

All that aside, I loved seeing places on television where Gran may have been and I know my parents got to visit her home town, Warminster, on one of their trips. I feel an affinity to much of the areas I see from her part of England. I also follow and love the Royal Family which is another part of England I like. I think watching Downton Abbey helped fuel my interest as did a special on the landscapes of England made by Capability Brown.

St George’s cross. England’s flag.

The flag of England is derived from St George’s Cross (heraldic blazon: Argent, a cross gules). The association of the red cross as an emblem of England can be traced back to the Middle Ages, and it was used as a component in the design of the Union Flag in 1606. source: Wikipedia

Scottish Heritage.

So the Aussie soldier who fell in love with the English rose was actually Scottish by birth and his family migrated from Scotland to Wollongong. He fought for “the King and Country” under the Australian flag in World War I. I never met him as he died when my Dad was 11.

However, again, I feel a great deal of affinity with all things and places Scottish. Two years ago I went to a Highland Games held locally and I was stoked. I got to see my family’s tartan and learn much more about the Clans. Of course, I see a documentary about Scotland and I want to visit! Yes I do. I once learned highland dancing as a little girl and it was fun. Not sure why it did not continue. Suspect not made to be a dancer.

I love the Scottish flag as it is based on St Andrew’s cross and what is my Dad’s and his Dad’s name? Andrew. I was actually born on 30 November, St Andrew’s Day.

St Andrew’s cross & the Scottish Flag

What does this mean about my home country?

It is that like most of us, other than the original Australians, we are all here in Australia but there is another country or countries’ heritage on our past!

About our current Australian flag…I like it but would like it to have something representative of the Aboriginal people on it too.

The present Australian flag can be considered to consist of three main elements:

  • The Union Jack in the upper hoist quadrant or first quarter (also know as the Canton), denoting Australia’s historical links with Great Britain. The Union Jack itself is composed of red and white intersecting and overlayed vertical and diagonal crosses on a blue background,
  • The Southern Cross in the second quarter (also known as the top or head) and fourth quarter. Consists of five stars in a more or less kite-like pattern – Alpha Crucis (7-point), Beta Crucis (7-point), Gamma Crucis (7-point), Delta Crucis (7-point) and the smaller Epsilon Crucis (5-point). The outer diameter of each of the 4 major stars is 1/7 the width of the fly and the inner diameter is 4/9 outer diameter; the diameter of Epsilon Crucisis 1/12 the width of the fly and the inner diameter is 4/9 the outer diameter. The constellation of the Southern Cross is a significant navigational feature of the southern hemisphere, strongly places Australia geographically and has been associated with the continent since its earliest days,
  • The Commonwealth Star or Star of Federation, central in the third quarter or lower hoist, has seven points to denote the six states and the combined territories of the Commonwealth. The seventh point was added in 1909. The outer diameter is 3/5 the width of the Union Jack (3/10 the width of the fly) and the inner diameter is 4/9 the outer diameter. source: http://www.anbg.gov.au/oz/flag.html

https://www.countryflags.com/en/australia-flag-image.html

That seems to be a post on flags..not really…but they are symbols of the countries and people I identify with most, so that was how I decided to address this prompt! These are some historical buildings in Sydney which relate to our colonial past.

What is your Home Country?

Or is your answer a bit complicated too?

Denyse.

Joining with Alicia here for Open Slather.

You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today!

Next Week’s Optional Prompt: 29/52. What Is Courage? 16/7/18.

#LifeThisWeek 28/52 What Is Your Home Country?


FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest

Beach or Bush. #LifeThisWeek 37/52. 2017.109.

Beach or Bush. #LifeThisWeek 37/52. 2017.109.

People talk of, and actually do in some cases, making ‘sea-changes’ and ‘tree-changes’ in life.

In our case we moved away from the hustle, bustle and mortgage-laden house in Sydney’s north-western suburbs to retire closer to the east coast. We both came from coastal upbringings as kids and teens and then our careers took us to the NSW countryside…the Bush as it is affectionately known. When we moved TO Sydney in 1978 it was to be closer to medical services, buy a house, settle into new roles at schools in the area and to be somewhat closer to family and, as it turned out, to have a second child.

The reasons to STAY there after almost 30 years dissipated so it was time for us. In renting on the NSW Central Coast – it’s a large regional area about 1.5 hours from the heart of Sydney – we have found the northern end where we are now, preferable for us in terms of cost of living and access to what we need. Nevertheless, we really have NO IDEA of where will eventually BUY again as we do not yet have the final funds. So, the idea of doing some investigating, via here for our choice of Beach or Bush was born.

Enjoy the pics and the words and see if you can work out what is my preference by the end!

 

If you had to make a choice of Beach or Bush what would yours be?

Denyse.

I link up here too on Mondays: Alicia’s Open Slather and Kell’s Mummy Mondays.

Life This Week kicks off for the remaining 3 months of the year with this: Beach or Bush. 37/52.

You can link up something old or new, just come on in. * Please add just ONE post each week! * Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not. * Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do! * Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right! * Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine! *Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice. * THANK you for linking up today! Next Week: Movies.


 

 

 

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest

A.N.Z.A.C. Day. #LifeThisWeek 17/52. 2017.59.

A.N.Z.A.C. Day. #LifeThisWeek 17/52. 2017.59.

I like A.N.Z.A.C. Day as a day of commemoration and reflection. It is not ever a day for celebration.

My knowledge of A.N.Z.A.C. Days goes back to when I was a Brownie and a Guide and we would be part of ceremony at Manly N.S.W. for the Morning Service. I wrote essays about A.N.Z.A.C. Day as part of my Modern History studies in the H.S.C. fifty years ago. It was said ‘this was when Australia became a nation in its own right.’

The day, 25th April, is the anniversary of the landings of Australian, New Zealand and Allied Forces at the bottom of the cliffs where the enemy was ready in the field. The many soldiers who lost their lives and gave themselves in battle there, and elsewhere, are never to be forgotten.

To know more about the first A.N.Z.A.C. Day and beyond, go here.

Now, we commemorate all of the wars where Australia has served. Far too many, of course.

2016 Poppy Project in Terrigal NSW.

How I remember A.N.Z.A.C. Day.

  • I often go to a local service if that is possible. I like to be part of the sense of community where I can. In 2015 and 2016 I did just that here on the Central Coast.
  • I think about my paternal grandfather who I never met. My Dad’s Dad. He was not quite 21 years old when he convinced his mother (he was an only son) to sign the papers so he could enlist. He fought in France. He survived and returned with a War Bride. My Grandmother who then lost her husband in an awful workplace accident some years later, leaving her with 4 children to rear alone. My Dad was #2 child.

One of these young men is my paternal grandfather. I do not know and even ough Dad is still around, the quality of the photo makes it difficult for identification. These are Aussies through and through!

Dad’s father: Andrew’s Certificate of Discharge in 1920. The war ended in late 1918 but of course, our troops had to be repatriated and as he became engaged to an English lass, she came to Australia in 1919-1920. Unsure of exact date. He was 24 on discharge.

  • I usually make A.N.Z.A.C. biscuits and may even tune into the March on TV in Sydney. I also might pop over to one of the local Services in the morning. I like to pay my respects and show appreciation.

I have a ‘thing’ about writing A.N.Z.A.C this way….because it is shortened for: Australia New Zealand Army Corps. The word is pronounced as ANZAC. The word is also carefully guarded by Australia and its use needs to be approved for any commercial use so as not to diminish the reverence with which the name is held. 

I decided that whilst I could have added more, I would refrain!

My Dad is someone who finds A.N.Z.A.C. Day difficult because he was restricted from serving as his family and friends did due to being in a ‘protected industry’. Instead, he volunteered in his local community as well as worked at the Steelworks as a trainee clerk.

My last word: It’s weird but if there had not been this War and the meeting of my paternal grandparents then…I would not have been born.

What does A.N.Z.A.C. Day mean for you?

Are there any special things you do on A.N.Z.A.C. Day?

Denyse.

Joining friends who also have Monday Link-Ups: Alicia here for Open Slather and Kell here for Mummy Mondays. Thank you for linking up for #lifethisweek. Here are the rules for the link-up “Life This Week” is a link up that runs every Monday and remains live for until Thursday at 5 p.m.during that week.

* You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week!

* Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine!

*Posts deemed by me, the owner of the blog and the link-up, to be unsuitable for my audience will be deleted without notice.

* THANK you for linking up today! Do come back next week. Next week’s prompt is “Taking Stock”.

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest

Daylight Saving Is OVER. #LifeThisWeek 14/52. 2017.50.

Daylight Saving Is OVER. #LifeThisWeek 13/52. 2017.50.

In Australia the 6 month daylight saving period is over as of 2 April 2017.

Not all parts of Australia take part and not everyone is a fan of it. I used to find the four month period of it better way back. I guess a lot of how we feel about daylight saving is personal and circumstantial .

I did write about it 6 months ago here. 

Hot days which stretch longer than necessary I find personally challenging and then I also do not like the darker mornings as it comes to a close. Nevertheless I understand that its purpose is for energy saving and using what natural light there is available. I am old enough to remember when it started in the early 1970s and I also recall daylight saving starting earlier in 2000 when Sydney hosted the Olympics.

http://www.cclscorp.com/ESW/Images/Daylightshutterstock_RetroClipArt_64847860.jpg

I did some research too about the history of daylight saving in Australia and add it here for you!

How and when did Daylight Saving Time get started in Australia?

Daylight Saving Time (DST) had its beginning in Australia during World War I. The Commonwealth used its wartime powers to require all Australian states and territories to put into place DST. 1917 was officially the first year DST was used across the country. It was in force between 1 January and 25 March (late summer in Australia). It was discontinued after the war, but World War II saw its return for three consecutive summers.

It began with a late summer start on 1 January 1942 followed by a full summer (September – March) later that year. Tasmania may be our smallest state, but they had great influence on why we have DST in Australia today. The Tasmanian state government implemented Daylight Savings in the summer of 1967 to save power which saved water. A severe drought in the state made it imperative that DST be used to help the situation. As it turned out, they liked having DST in Tasmania so much so that they have continued it ever since. Because it was such a success, the Tasmanian state government pushed to get Daylight Saving Time used Australia-wide.

By 1971 legislation was passed by all states, except the Northern Territory and Western Australia, to run a trial period. Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia made it permanent in 1972. Currently Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia do not have Daylight Savings. Often confusing dates and changes although efforts have been made to unify DST dates across Australia, the Federal Government has kept it the responsibility of individual state and territory governments to decide when and if Daylight Savings will be implemented locally.

As a result, DST has varied at times depending on local issues. For example New South Wales extended DST in 1981-2 because of power shortages. During the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games special Daylight Savings Times were observed by some, but not all. This lack of uniformity is blamed for the serious problems in scheduling and reduced hours available to work with others across state lines. Daylight Saving Time also means Australia has 5 time zones when in effect. http://www.alldownunder.com/australian-dates/time-daylight-savings-2.htm

I posted a photo on Saturday as a reminder to my Instagram and Facebook followers that it was the night to remember to put the clocks back and saw that not everyone was happy for it to be over. So, are you a fan or not? How much does your life change when daylight saving begins or ends?

It’s back again on 1 October 2017 by the way!

Thanks for being part of Life This Week on Monday 3 April 2017.

Denyse.

Joining Alicia for Open Slather and Kell for Mummy Mondays.

Thanks for linking up this week.

Here are the rules for the link-up “Life This Week” is a link up that runs every Monday and remains live for until Thursday at 5 p.m.during that week.

* You can link up something old or new, just come on in.

* Please add just ONE post each week!

* Feel free to go with the prompt for the week to add your ‘take’ on the prompt. Or not.

* Please do stay to comment on my post as I always reply and it’s a bloggy thing to do!

* Check out what others are up to by leaving a comment because we all love our comments, right!

* Add a link back to this blog in your post somewhere. I don’t have a ‘button’ so a link in text is fine!

* THANK you for linking up today! Do come back next week. Next week’s prompt is “Easter”.

FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest
FacebooktwitterpinterestFacebooktwitterpinterest